98
98
Circle of Giovanni Battista Foggini (1652-1725)
Italian, Florence, circa 1700
URN
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
98
Circle of Giovanni Battista Foggini (1652-1725)
Italian, Florence, circa 1700
URN
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Sculpture and Works of Art Including Highlights from the Reinhold Hofstätter Collection

|
London

Circle of Giovanni Battista Foggini (1652-1725)
Italian, Florence, circa 1700
URN
veined light grey marble, on a veined dark grey marble base
24.5 by 44 by 23cm., 9 5/8  by 17 3/8  by 9 1/8 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

The festoons draped from the mouths of the grotesques on this beautifully carved cool grey marble urn recall similar devices in central Italian architecture from circa 1700. Observe, for example, the same motif above a door from the Palazzo Medici Riccardi, Florence, which was designed by Giuseppe Broccetti (Spinelli, op. cit., p. 349, fig. 391). Gadrooning, as seen at the sides of the present urn, is a device used throughout Italian Renaissance and Baroque fine and applied art, but was employed frequently in the late 17th and 18th centuries. See, for example, the Lavamano from Santa Maria Novella, also in Florence (Bellesi et al, op. cit., pp. 248-248, no. 125).

With its female grotesques at the short sides, combined with gadrooning, the present urn particularly recalls designs by the great Florentine master Giovanni Battista Foggini. Compare, for example, with his Urn published by Bellesi et al (op. cit., p. 329, fig. 27) and note the similarly expressive faces with full cheeks and pouting lips. The present urn was previously attributed to Giovanni Battista Casella (1623-1678) on the basis of a comparison with tomb monuments by the Genoese sculptor in Bardiglio grey marble, which have analogous baroque swags, scrolls and masks. The comparison with Foggini's designs might nonetheless indicate a dating slightly later in the 17th century or in the early 18th century. The sculpture is, regardless, a small scale triumph of late baroque decorative carving, sensitively and finely executed by an experienced hand.

RELATED LITERATURE
R. Spinelli, Giovan Battista Foggini: Architetto Primario della Casa dei Medici (1652-1725), Florence, 2003; S. Bellesi and M. Visonà, Giovacchino Fortini: Scultura architettura decorazione e committenza a Firenze al tempo degli ultimi Medici, Florence, 2008 

Old Master Sculpture and Works of Art Including Highlights from the Reinhold Hofstätter Collection

|
London