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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF SERGIO TOMASINELLI

Man Ray
NON-EUCLIDEAN OBJECT
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
34

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF SERGIO TOMASINELLI

Man Ray
NON-EUCLIDEAN OBJECT
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modernités : de Rodin à Soulages

|
Paris

Man Ray
1890 - 1976
NON-EUCLIDEAN OBJECT
inscribed Man Ray and numbered EA, with two silver hallmarks (on the polyhedral form)
assemblage: aluminium, steel, rubber tubing, and silver on wooden base
height (including base): 44 cm; 17 1/4  in.
Conceived in 1932 and executed in 1973 in an edition of 9 plus artist’s proofs (Binder, Brussels), the present example is an artist’s proof.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Luciano Anselmino, Galleria Il Fauno, Turin (acquired directly from the artist)
Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 1975

Literature

Man Ray, Oggetti d'affezione, Milan, 1970, no. 28, illustration of the 1932 example
Jean-Hubert Martin, Rosalind Krauss & Brigitte Hermann, Man Ray: Objets de mon affection, Sculptures et Objets, Catalogue raisonné, Paris, 1983, no. 42, illustration of the 1932 example, p. 52
Dictionnaire de l'Objet Surréaliste, ed. Didier Ottinger, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2013, p. 201, illustration in colour of another example from the edition, p. 202
Man Ray, Human Equations, A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare (exhibition catalogue), The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C. & The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 2015, illustration in colour of another example from the edition, p. 209

Catalogue Note

Non-Euclidean Object is an important example of Man Ray's lifelong interest in mathematics and geometry. It is composed of a polyhedron mounted at an angle on a metal rod coiled with rubber tubing. The polyhedron composed of twenty hexagons and twelve pentagons, known to mathematicians as a truncated icosahedron, also intrigued the artists of the Renaissance, from Piero della Francesca to Leonardo da Vinci.

This object was first exhibited at the Exposition surréaliste at the Galerie Pierre Colle in Paris in 1933 under the intriguing title Brevet S.G.D.G., meaning "Patent without Governmental Guarantee," a humorous title typical of Man Ray for a clearly useless invention. Around this time, Man Ray incorporated the polyhedron in two photographic compositions alongside objects integral to Man Ray's work, including his own life mask as well as symbols of the artist and his creations.

The title Non-Euclidean Object was not coined until 1944 when a new version was made for the exhibition at the Circle Gallery in Hollywood, Objects of My Affection. Man Ray's description of the object in the accompanying album as "a variation with flat instead of curved planes" may indicate a degree
of understanding of non-Euclidean geometry, an expression coined in the nineteenth century to describe the new geometries, including spherical geometry and hyperbolic geometry, that defied Euclid's postulate that two parallel lines could neither intersect nor diverge, which is true of a flat plane.

Modernités : de Rodin à Soulages

|
Paris