368
368
Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur de Merprès
THREE WOMEN IN THE GARDEN
Estimate
1,200,0001,800,000
LOT SOLD. 2,480,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
368
Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur de Merprès
THREE WOMEN IN THE GARDEN
Estimate
1,200,0001,800,000
LOT SOLD. 2,480,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

|
Hong Kong

Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur de Merprès
1880 - 1958
THREE WOMEN IN THE GARDEN

Provenance

Sotheby's Singapore, April 2, 2000, Lot 16
Private Collection, Malaysia

Catalogue Note

As a quintessential European Impressionist painter, Le Mayeur sought to unearth and portray an untainted sense of beauty. Following the footsteps of French artist Paul Gauguin, he began his search in Tahiti, an island that he soon found too commercialized. However, after discovering the unadulterated island of Bali during his first visit in 1929, Le Mayeur was immediately captivated by the exotic culture, the graceful women and the scenic beauty of the Balinese vistas.

In 1932, he migrated to the sun-kissed enclave, where he would marry the exquisite Legong Dancer Ni Wayan Pollok Tjoeglik (colloquially known as Ni Pollok), one of his young Balinese models. It is ubiquitously known that Le Mayeur’s portrayal of feminine beauty was influenced by his profound affection for his spouse and muse, Ni Pollok. Upon viewing the present lot, it is evident that every banal activity of Ni Pollok managed to inspire the artist.

This tranquil and contented scene consists of her performing the simple and carefree task of picking flowers in a garden with two other maidens. Featuring nature, flora and exquisite Balinese women, this work rejoices the most darling motifs of this Belgain-born artist. It subtly blends his subjects aesthetically into their natural milieu, uniting the women purposefully with the elements of nature.

Apart from his depiction of lush nature and lithe women, it is his characteristic coloring and the manner in which he applies pigment onto the canvas that truly makes Le Mayeur a renowned artist. In accordance with the habits of an Impressionist painter, Le Mayeur painted outdoors to capture sights bathed in natural light. The late afternoon glow in the present lot exhales with the fresh breeze of the tropical alfresco.

It is evident that through his aesthetic process of capturing the splendors of the island, Le Mayeur truly assimilated into Indonesian culture. This work radiates with a certain vibrancy and joy: it is truly telling of Le Mayeur’s love for Bali, an abode that brought the artist absolute bliss and liberation so tangible in his aesthetic expressions.

Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

|
Hong Kong