129
129

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE SWISS COLLECTION

Gustave Loiseau
BRUME SUR L’EURE, SAINT-CYR
JUMP TO LOT
129

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE SWISS COLLECTION

Gustave Loiseau
BRUME SUR L’EURE, SAINT-CYR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Gustave Loiseau
1865 - 1935
BRUME SUR L’EURE, SAINT-CYR
signed G. Loiseau (lower left)
oil on canvas
60 by 73 cm., 23 5/8 by 28 3/4 in.
Painted circa 1900.
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This work will be included in the forthcoming Loiseau Catalogue raisonné being prepared by Didier Imbert.

Provenance

Paul Durand-Ruel, Paris (acquired directly from the artist on April 1900)
Monsieur & Madame d'Alayer, Paris (by descent from the above in 1949)
Private Collection, Switzerland (acquired by 1979)
Thence by descent to the present owner

Literature

Jean Melas-Kyriazi, Gustave Loiseau, l'Historiographe de la Seine, Athens, 1979, illustrated p. 42

Catalogue Note

Gustave Loiseau’s Brume sur l’Eure, Saint-Cyr is a wonderful evocation of the French countryside. In his landscapes, Loiseau often experimented with a high horizon line and created a number of paintings dominated by wild vegetation. The present work’s rich surface, composed using spontaneous brushwork and areas of thickly applied paint, exemplifies the artist's instinctive use of Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist techniques which he derived from his close relationship with Claude Monet.

Indeed, underlying the beauty of this painting is a subject with special significance for citizens of France. During the French Revolution the poplar had been selected as the tree of liberty. Paul Tucker tells us that “the reasons for this choice remain obscure, but it was most likely due to the derivation of the name from the Latin populous, which means both ‘people’ and ‘popular.’ Whatever the rationale, by 1793, 60,000 poplars had been planted in France and hundreds of broadsides had been issued with the tree as a symbol of the new republic" (Paul Tucker, Monet in the 90s, The Series Paintings, Boston, 1989, p. 138). The poplar continued as an important political symbol during the nineteenth century, and in 1889, at the time of the hundred-year anniversary of the Revolution, there were again ceremonial plantings of poplars throughout the country.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London