61
61
James McCabe, London
A FINE AND RARE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATOR 1875, NO. 08325
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
61
James McCabe, London
A FINE AND RARE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATOR 1875, NO. 08325
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

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London

James McCabe, London
A FINE AND RARE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATOR 1875, NO. 08325
Movement: gilded half plate, spring detent escapement, free-sprung bi-metallic compensation balance, blued steel helical spring, diamond endstone, fusee and chain, setting square for hand-set and winding, signed and numbered Jas McCabe, Royal Exchange, London 08325  
 Dial: silver, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, subsidiary at 12 for state of wind indication, Arabic subsidiary seconds at 6, gold fleur-de-lys hands, signed and numbered Jas McCabe, Royal Exchange London, 08325
Case: plain gold case, gold hand-set button to band with protective shoulders, gold pendant and bow, polished gold cuvette, case, cuvette and pendant with maker's mark AS incuse for Alfred Stram, case and cuvette numbered 08325, hallmarked London 1875
diameter 52 mm
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Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, p. 410, pl. 262

Catalogue Note

The style of this watch’s dial appears to be heavily influenced by the marine chronometers which were sold by the McCabes, with a horizontally satin finished dial and subsidiary dials for state of wind and seconds. To the movement’s backplate are winding and hand-setting squares which can be used when the movement is out of its case or if the keyless mechanism encounters a problem.

A concise history of the McCabe family by Paul Hackamack can be found in Antiquarian Horology, No. 3, Vol. 10, Summer 1977, pp. 308-316. James McCabe was born c. 1748 in Ireland near to Belfast and moved to London in 1775. The firm is recorded at Fleet Street, Cheapside and the Royal Exchange. In 1781, McCabe was made a Freeman of the Clockmakers’ Company, later becoming a Warden.  James died in 1811 and the firm was continued by his youngest son Robert. Robert died in 1860 and, in turn, his eldest son, Robert Jeremy McCabe, continued the family business until he closed it in 1879/80. Robert Jeremy appears to have spent the remainder of his life as “a man of independent means” and died in 1902 [op. cit. p. 309].

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

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London