59
59
H.L.Brown & Son, London & Sheffield
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS LEVER WATCH WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATION 1905, NO. 37918
Estimate
7,0009,000
JUMP TO LOT
59
H.L.Brown & Son, London & Sheffield
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS LEVER WATCH WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATION 1905, NO. 37918
Estimate
7,0009,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

|
London

H.L.Brown & Son, London & Sheffield
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS LEVER WATCH WITH UP-AND-DOWN INDICATION 1905, NO. 37918
• Movement: nickel silver half plate, escapement with gold lever, brass ratchet tooth escape wheel, jewelled to the centre, bi-metallic compensation balance, micrometer regulation, diamond endstone, fusee and chain, signed H.L. Brown & Son: London & Sheffield, Watchmakers to the Admiralty, No. 37918
• 
Dial: Venetian white enamel, bold black Roman numerals, outer minute ring, two recessed subsidiary dials for state of wind indication at 12 and subsidiary seconds at 6 o’clock, blued steel spade hands, signed H.L Brown & Son, London & Sheffield
• 
Case: plain gold polished covers, gold hand-set button to the band with olivette, a second larger gold pusher to the band engages movement to allow winding, gold pendant and thief-proof bow, the back opening to reveal a hinged plain gold cuvette, covers and cuvette with maker's mark FT London with incuse A above for Fred Thoms and numbered 37918, London hallmarks for 1905 
diameter 52 mm
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Provenance

Sotheby’s Geneva, 17th May 2000, lot 222
Christie’s South Kensington, 23rd July 1987, lot 158

Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 444, pl. 288

Catalogue Note

Most unusually for an English watch, the half-plate movement is made of nickel silver and the wheel train is a gold alloy. The nickel silver alloy is much less likely to tarnish than brass and usually consists of around 50% copper, 30% zinc and 20% nickel. In order to wind the watch, the pusher to the band between 2 and 3 o’clock must be pressed simultaneously whilst turning the crown – this feature was intended to encourage careful winding, which together with observation of the state of wind indicator would have helped to prevent over-winding of, and thereby damage to, the fusee movement.

Brian Loomes in his book, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, notes the firm Harris Leon Brown of Sheffield was already active by 1871 [op. cit. , Vol. 2, 1989, p. 32]. H. L. Brown appears to have been a successful retailing business and it is known that Usher and Cole supplied them with a repeating chronograph (their number 28180) in October 1894, especially signed and numbered 26515.

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

|
London