24
24
Daniel Quare, London
A FINE SILVER PAIR CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1710, NO. 3762
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 15,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
24
Daniel Quare, London
A FINE SILVER PAIR CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1710, NO. 3762
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 15,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

|
London

Daniel Quare, London
A FINE SILVER PAIR CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1710, NO. 3762
Movement: gilded full plate, verge escapement, large and elaborate pierced and decoratively engraved balance cock symmetrically arranged with a pair of birds and dolphin heads amidst scrolling foliage, a female head at the neck, flat steel three-arm balance with spring, fusee and chain, crested Egyptian pillars, signed and numbered D. Quare, London, 3762
 Dial: silver champlevé, Roman numerals with half hour divisions between and to the ring below, outer Arabic minute ring, outer gilt ring, female square above aperture with calibrated blued steel disc for regulation, winding aperture at 3 o'clock, blued steel tulip hour hand, the poker minute hand stepped to clear winding square, the centre chased and engraved with a lion and unicorn with central cartouche signed Quare
• Cases: plain silver inner, stirrup pendant and bow, case maker's mark WI incuse for William Jaques and numbered 3762 • silver outer case with square hinge, the back centred with a complex engraved monogramcase maker's mark WG incuse probably for William Ginn
diameter of outer case 52 mm, inner case 46 mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, pp. 154-155, pl. 81

Catalogue Note

The deep movement and case of this watch, together with the placement of the winding aperture to the dial rather than case back, are reminiscent of contemporary so-called ‘oignon’ watches which had become a well-established French fashion at this time. As in this instance, Quare often favoured placing a calibrated disc and square for adjusting the regulation to the dial; this feature made it easier for the watch’s owner to regulate the timekeeping, whilst also discouraging them from opening their watch to inspect the movement unnecessarily.

For a note on Daniel Quare see lot 18.

Celebration of the English Watch, Part III, The Genius of Thomas Tompion

|
London