558
558
A George II silver-gilt caddy set, Paul de Lamerie, circa 1732
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
558
A George II silver-gilt caddy set, Paul de Lamerie, circa 1732
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

From Earth to Fire

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London

A George II silver-gilt caddy set, Paul de Lamerie, circa 1732
quadrangular form with incurved angles, engraved with shells within strapwork and diaperwork, crest and coat of arms below an earl's coronet, the sliding covers with folding finials, one initialled B, one initialled G, the third engraved with bust of man and woman, maker's mark only on two, the third unmarked
10cm., 4 in. & 10.5cm., 4 1/8 in. high
1508.8gr.; 48oz. 10dwt.
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Provenance

Sotheby's Park Bernet Los Angeles, 21 October 1973, lot 36
Sotheby's New York, 22 April 1998, lot 40

Catalogue Note

The arms are those of Spencer impaling Trevor for Charles Spencer, 5th Earl of Sunderland (1706-1758) who was married on 23 May 1732 to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Trevor, 2nd Baron Trevor.  Lord Sunderland, as 3rd Duke, succeeded to the honours of his grandfather, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, upon the death on 24 October 1733 of his aunt, Henrietta, Duchess of Marlborough. He had a distinguished career in the army and was briefly Lord Privy Seal in 1755.

These caddies, which are struck with de Lamerie’s fourth mark, entered on 27 March 1732, almost certainly date from about the time of Lord and Lady Sunderland’s marriage in May 1732. The male and female profiles engraved on one of the sliding covers would appear to be a reference to the newlywed couple. Other examples of engraved profiles representing real individuals, as opposed to mythological or historical figures, have been noted on a pair of silver salvers, Ebenezer Coker, London, 1772 (Sotheby’s, London, 22 November 1984, lot 76). They are thought to have been a 50th wedding anniversary present to Mr and Mrs Peter Lehoup, with whose coat-of-arms they are each engraved within a border of drapery, urns and profiles. The latter show the couple in young and old age.

The remarkable de Lamerie silver-gilt rococo inkstand, London, 1738, which is in the possession of the present Duke of Marlborough, was probably also made for the 3rd Duke (Paul de Lamerie, The Work of England’s Master Silversmith, exhibition catalogue, Goldsmiths’ Hall, London, 1990, p. 145, no. 94)

From Earth to Fire

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London