514
514
A German parcel-gilt silver drinking cup/centrepiece, modelled as Gustavus Adolphus II King of Sweden, pseudo marks, probably Hanau, 19th century
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
514
A German parcel-gilt silver drinking cup/centrepiece, modelled as Gustavus Adolphus II King of Sweden, pseudo marks, probably Hanau, 19th century
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

From Earth to Fire

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London

A German parcel-gilt silver drinking cup/centrepiece, modelled as Gustavus Adolphus II King of Sweden, pseudo marks, probably Hanau, 19th century
in 17th century style; the horse rearing slightly with detachable head and adorned with regalia, the figure astride with one arm holding reigns, the other outstretched clasping a baton, the simulated rocky ground applied with frogs, birds and flowers, on a waisted circular base chased with ornate scrolls, on three stylised gothic mask scrolling feet
41cm., 16 1/4 in. high
2708.8gr., 87oz 18dwt
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Provenance

This example can be found in the collection of Leopold de Rothschild (1845-1917), the British financier, horse breeder and member of the eminent banking family. See pg. 29 and pl. XXIX, E. Alfred Jones, Catalogue of the Collection of Old Plate of Leopold de Rothschild Esq, London, 1907.

Catalogue Note

The Statuette of a Cavalier on Horseback, as it is described in the inventory, was thought to be mid-17th century German, although is now considered to be mid-19th century and probably of Hanau manufacture.

These statues, copying the great trinkspiel cups of the 17th century, were prominent centrepieces and talking points in noble European families. This model of King Gustavus Adolphus II of Sweden, copying the original by David Schwestermuller, Augsburg, circa 1645 (see Seling, vol. 2, pl. 587), now in the National Museum Stockholm, was probably made as a posthumous tribute to the Swedish King. Also known as The Lion of North, King Adolphus is credited with establishing Sweden as a major European power and is regarded as one of the great military commanders of all time. He led Sweden to military supremacy during the Thirty Years war, taking victory at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631, the first notable victory for the Protestant armies during the conflict. However, at the Battle of Lutzen in November 1632, King Adolphus was killed after becoming separated during a cavalry charge. He was the first and last Swedish leader to be bestowed the title Den Store or The Great and is considered a heroic figure in Swedish folklore. 

From Earth to Fire

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London