72
72
A mahogany and mahogany veneered armchair, late 18th century, circa 1792, stamped G.IACOB
Estimate
35,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT
72
A mahogany and mahogany veneered armchair, late 18th century, circa 1792, stamped G.IACOB
Estimate
35,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Excellence Française

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A mahogany and mahogany veneered armchair, late 18th century, circa 1792, stamped G.IACOB
the curved open back with a pierced frieze of palmettes, the straight arms on curved dolphins with lion head supports, on baluster shaped front legs, upholstered in purple silk with gold floral garlands, with the iron mark TH. and the three crowned fleurs-de-lys in an oval, and the ink marks 1250, 12288 and 43559
Haut. 101 cm., larg. 63,5 cm. ; Height 39¾in., width 25in.
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Provenance

- Probably delivered for the Comité de Salut Public at the Convention, pavillon de Flore du palais des Tuileries, circa 1793;
- Garde-Meuble de l'Assemblée nationale from November 4th, 1795;
- Palais du Luxembourg for the service du Directoire exécutif from November 5th, 1795;
- Sent to the palais des Tuileries, probably for the Salon du consul Le Brun circa 1800;
- Stayed at least until the Restauration at the palais des Tuileries;
- Sale Artemisia/Blanchet et Associés, Paris, May 28th, 2014, lot 164

Literature

Related literature: 
- Exh. Cat. Sièges en société. Histoire du siège du Roi-Soleil à Marianne, Paris, 2017, p. 182.
- L. de Groër, Les arts décoratifs de 1790 à 1850, Fribourg, 1985, p. 22, fig. 27.
- M. Jarry, Le siège français, Fribourg/Paris, 1973, fig. 264.
- D. Ledoux-Lebard, Les ébénistes du XIXe Siècle 1795-1889. Leurs oeuvres et leurs marques, Paris, 1984, p. 289.
- J.-P. Samoyault, Mobilier français Consulat et Empire, Paris, 2009, p. 18, fig. 12.

Catalogue Note

This armchair is probably from a suite made by George Jacob, circa 1792-1793 for the Comité de Salut Public at the pavillon de Flore (palais des Tuileries). According to Jean-Pierre Samoyault, (exh. cat. Sièges en société, p. 182), this suite of chairs was later sent to the National Garde-meuble and thereafter to the Palais du Luxembourg for the Directoire Exécutif.  François Lebrun (1739 – 1824), Third Consul and Prince-Treasurer of the First Empire, used part of this suite in his hôtel particulier de Noailles, and these are now at the Mobilier National (4 armchairs, 6 chairs. 1 canapé was later added by Lebrun; one chair illustrated fig. 2).

One example is in the Musée Marmottan and has the advantage of having a preserved stamp and glued paper on the backrest. Jacob claimed to be the inventor of the technique he called "camées" [cameo]. Our armchair no longer has this, but the chair in the Musée Marmottan and the one in the former Rouart Collection still have it (fig. 1). The armchairs at Malmaison and Bois-Préau have lost their frieze (inv. M.M.40.47.811, fig. 3). The palmette on the pierced frieze is inspired by the pattern invented by Jacob for Marie-Antoinette's dairy at Rambouillet in 1787 (now at the Petit Trianot at Versailles).

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