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A mahogany, tulipwood, amaranth, ivory and ebony inlaid mechanical games table, late 18th/early 19th century
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65
A mahogany, tulipwood, amaranth, ivory and ebony inlaid mechanical games table, late 18th/early 19th century
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A mahogany, tulipwood, amaranth, ivory and ebony inlaid mechanical games table, late 18th/early 19th century
with amaranth stringing, opening to reveal three foldout leaves one of which reveals a secret drawer, the first fold out with a green leather baize, the second centered by an ebony and light wood veneered games board, the third with a retractable tric-trac box and two compartments with successive trays, on tapering legs
The table closed: Height 73,5 cm.,width 86,5 cm., depth 43,5 cm. ; Height 29in., width 34in., depth 17¼in.
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Catalogue Note

Board games such as cards, chess and tric-trac were very fashionable throughout the 18th century, which explains the trend for gaming tables purchased by the upper and middle classes of the time. Many European Royal Estates and townhouses had a Salon des jeux, like that of Marie-Antoinette at Compiègne, which housed several tables of different shapes for multiple purposes. The gaming tables also facilitated the taste for technical and complicated mechanical pieces of furniture in which the cabinetmaker David Roentgen excelled. In 1771, Roentgen created his first neoclassical mechanical table for his patron, Prince Friedrich III Leopold Friedrich von Anhalt-Dessau. The construction of the table we are presenting would have been inspired by Roentgen's production (see the table at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in Wolfram Koeppe et al., Extravagant Inventions, the princely furniture of the Roentgens, New York, 2012, No. 45, pp. 163-165).

Excellence Française

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Paris