18
18
A tapestry depicting 'Europe' from the tenture des Quatre parties du monde, Brussels, late 17th/early 18th century, after Lodewijk Van Schoor, probably by Alexander Baert Ier
Estimate
50,00080,000
LOT SOLD. 56,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
18
A tapestry depicting 'Europe' from the tenture des Quatre parties du monde, Brussels, late 17th/early 18th century, after Lodewijk Van Schoor, probably by Alexander Baert Ier
Estimate
50,00080,000
LOT SOLD. 56,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A tapestry depicting 'Europe' from the tenture des Quatre parties du monde, Brussels, late 17th/early 18th century, after Lodewijk Van Schoor, probably by Alexander Baert Ier
made with wool and silk, depicting Europe as a young lady on a throne, facing three women symbolizing the Arts, the Music and the Sciences, with crowns at her feet, pointing with her sceptre at the three figures at her right, representing the wealth of the continent
329,5 cm. x 572 cm. ; 129¾in. x 225¼in.
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Literature

Literature references:
E. Kalf, 'Vier van Deelen of Weereldt als Andersints', in Artes Textiles, Ghent, 1981, vol. X, pp. 238-239, 244

Catalogue Note

At the end of the 17th century, Nicolaas Naulaerts, an Antwerp tapestry merchant, commissioned the tenture, "Four parts of the world" to Lodewijk Van Schoor, a major figure in Flemish tapestry during the late 17th and early 18th century, in the same vein as Victor Honoré Janssens and Jan van Orley. A member of the Antwerp painters Guild since 1664, then of the Brussels Guild in 1678, this painter was specialized in allegorical and mythological figures. The attribution of these cartoons to Van Schoor was made possible due to the mention of his name in some of Naulaerts' documents, as well as his signature on some versions of the "Four parts of the world" tenture.


The wall hangings, "Quatre parties du monde" consists of four continents, Europe, Asia, America and Africa. Australia, although known since 1616, will not really be considered a continent in itself until the second half of the 18th century, after the explorations of James Cook in the Pacific, which changed the traditional iconography. Our tapestry represents Europe, depicted here by a young woman sitting on a canopied throne, facing three women embodying Arts, Music and Science. A set of crowns at her feet, Europe points with her scepter to three figures to her left, appearing to symbolize the strength and wealth of the continent.


The production of the tapestries can be attributed to the weaver Alexander Baert due to the signature visible on a version of the tapestry housed in the Museo Nacional de Arte Antigua, Lisbon dated 1690. Baert was owner of a workshop in Oudenaarde, then in Gouda from 1696 and finally in Amsterdam from 1700.  Another copy of the series, where the "Four parts of the world" are accompanied by allegories of Victory and Abundance, are in the collection at the Petit Palais, Paris (inv. PP 03514), and would be slightly later, dating between 1698 and 1752 and produced by Baert's workshop, this time in Amsterdam.

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Paris