13
13
A pair of gilt-bronze mounted amaranth coquillers in Régence style, in the manner of André-Charles Boulle
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 46,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
13
A pair of gilt-bronze mounted amaranth coquillers in Régence style, in the manner of André-Charles Boulle
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 46,250 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Excellence Française

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Paris

A pair of gilt-bronze mounted amaranth coquillers in Régence style, in the manner of André-Charles Boulle
of oval shape with eighteen drawers, on six curved legs ending in foliate paw feet
Quantity: 2
Height 83 cm., width 132,5 cm., depth 71 cm. ; Height 32⅔in., width 52¼in., depth 28in.
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Provenance

Commissioned by Charles de Beistegui for his hôtel particulier rue de Constantine in Paris

Catalogue Note

This pair of coquillers is the exact copy of a pair commissioned by Louis-Léon Pajot, Count d'Ons-en-Bray,(1678-1754) who attained the position of Intendant Général des Postes et Relais de France in 1708. After retiring to his residence in Bercy following the death of Louis XIV, he devoted himself to his passion for science, physics and mechanics and he commissioned a pair of coquilliers to exhibit his collection of shells.  This pair were part of the Wildenstein Collection (Christie's sale, London, December 14, 2005, lot 20).

These coquillers, sometimes confused with medal cabinets ('médaillers'), are pieces of furniture which as the name suggests, were used to house and preserve shells. Very few examples have survived, apart from the mahogany cabinet which belonged to Clément Lafaille, now in the Museum of Natural History in La Rochelle and the famous coquiller cabinet made for Ange-Laurent Lalive de Jully, attributed to Joseph Baumhauer, today in a private collection.

The present pair of Régence style coquiller cabinets would have been made for the collector Charles de Beistegui (1895-1970). Son of an ambassador and heir to a Mexican silver mine fortune, he spent his life between several residences which he acquired and redecorated, often with the help of Emilio Terry.  Amongst others, he owned the castle of Groussay in Montfort-l'Amaury, the Labia palace in Venice, an apartment on the Champs-Elysées by Le Corbusier, and a hôtel particulier in rue de Constantine, Paris, the latter of which housed the present pair of coquillier cabinets.

Excellence Française

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Paris