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PROPERTY FROM THE LIBRARY AT FETTERCAIRN HOUSE

Latitude at sea, and other subjects
COLLECTION OF 12 WORKS IN ONE VOLUME:
LOT SOLD. 1,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
91

PROPERTY FROM THE LIBRARY AT FETTERCAIRN HOUSE

Latitude at sea, and other subjects
COLLECTION OF 12 WORKS IN ONE VOLUME:
LOT SOLD. 1,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

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London

Latitude at sea, and other subjects
COLLECTION OF 12 WORKS IN ONE VOLUME:
Hadley, George. A description of a new instrument... for taking the latitude or other altitudes at sea. With directions for its use. T.Wood, 1734, folding engraved frontispiece; and others, including some on trade and revenue, and Henley's English grammar (1726), cropped; 8vo, eighteenth-century quarter calf, marbled boards (spine numbered 294), some leaves stained or browned, binding slightly worn (1)
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Provenance

The Forbes Baronetcy was created in 1626 for Sir William Forbes (d. circa 1650) by James VI in the Barontage of Nova Scotia. The majority of the works offered here were acquired by the sixth Baronet, also William (1739-1806), who added Pitsligo to his title in 1781. He was an eminent Scottish banker and benefactor, good friend of James Boswell and Samuel Johnson (see lots 45-46), and finally succeeded in recovering the Pitsligo estates forfeited after the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. His son William, the seventh baronet, beat Sir Walter Scott to the hand of the renowned beauty Williamina Belsches Stuart (1776-1810), and it was with their marriage that the family moved to her family seat, Fettercairn House in Kincardineshire, Aberdeenshire.

One of the sixth baronet’s acquisitions for his library at Pitsligo were numerous highly important miscellanies and tract volumes, many of which were purchased as a set from Edinburgh bookseller Elphinstone Balfour in October 1786. These were subsequently supplemented by further contemporary tracts and other works from the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century. Most of these miscellanies bear a nineteenth century Forbes family bookplate.

Catalogue Note

In 1730 The mathematician and natural philosopher John Hadley (1682--1744) invented the quadrant - completely independently of Thomas Godfrey of Philadelphia who also claimed the invention - for measuring the altitude of the Sun or a star above the horizon to find geographic position at sea.

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

|
London