171
171
Greene, Graham
THE NAME OF ACTION. WILLIAM HEINEMANN, 1930
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
171
Greene, Graham
THE NAME OF ACTION. WILLIAM HEINEMANN, 1930
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

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London

Greene, Graham
THE NAME OF ACTION. WILLIAM HEINEMANN, 1930
8vo, FIRST EDITION, PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY GREENE TO KENNETH RICHMOND ("For Kenneth Richmond | from | Graham Greene | Oct. 1930.") on the front free endpaper, half-title, original dark blue cloth, lettered in gilt on spine, FIRST ISSUE DUST-JACKET (priced "7/6" on spine), collector's folding morocco box by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, boards slightly rubbed, some spotting, repairs to head spine of dust-jacket at head and to small section below the price, further repairs to a few small tears
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Literature

Wobbe A3a

Catalogue Note

AN IMPORTANT ASSOCIATION COPY INSCRIBED TO THE TEENAGE GREENE'S PSYCHOANALYST. 

At the age of sixteen and following several years of deep unhappiness at boarding school, Greene was sent to stay with psychoanalyst Kenneth Richmond and his wife Zoe. As Greene wrote in A Sort of Life, "I don't know by what process of elimination my father and brother chose Kenneth Richmond to be my analyst, but it was a choice for which I have never ceased to be grateful, for at his house in Lancaster Gate began what were perhaps the happiest six months of my life".

A testament to his significance in the author's life, some nine years after his treatment, Greene sent this copy of his second novel to Richmond. He would go on to devote almost an entire chapter of his autobiography to these six months. Richmond was himself a writer and well connected in the literary world, and it was at his home that Greene was introduced to Walter de la Mare (a childhood favourite) and other authors and editors. This, combined with the tranquility of life in west London and Richmond's sensitive approach to the young man's fragile mental health "liberated" Greene, and "helped to start him on his long road as a writer" (Sherry, The Life of Graham Greene, Volume One (1990), p.99).

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

|
London