126
126
Austen, Jane
NORTHANGER ABBEY: AND PERSUASIAN. JOHN MURRAY, 1818 
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
126
Austen, Jane
NORTHANGER ABBEY: AND PERSUASIAN. JOHN MURRAY, 1818 
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

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London

Austen, Jane
NORTHANGER ABBEY: AND PERSUASIAN. JOHN MURRAY, 1818 
4 volumes, 12mo, FIRST EDITION, half-titles (between the preliminary leaves and first page of text in each volume, as issued), paper watermarked "AP | 1816 | 2", later full calf, gilt border, flat spine gilt, titled in gilt on red labels, volume numbers and dated in gilt on red and green labels, all edges speckled, gilt dentelles, marbled endpapers, titles and a few leaves strengthened at gutter, some spotting and browning
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Provenance

Revd. Fulwar Craven Fowle (1764-1840), ownership signature ("F.C. Fowle") on title of each volume

The Craven Fowle family had many associations with the Austen family, and on several occasions Jane visited the vicarage in Kintbury, where the Fowles had lived since 1741. As well as being distantly related to the family, both Fulwar and his brother Tom had been taught at Steventon by George Austen, and in 1792, Tom became engaged to Jane’s sister Cassandra. Not being able to afford to marry at that time, Tom was appointed as one of Lord Craven’s domestic chaplains and in 1795 travelled with him to the West Indies where he caught yellow fever and died. Cassandra received £1,000 in his will, and never married.

In the same year as Tom’s death, the eldest Austen brother James married Mary Lloyd, the sister of Fulwar’s wife Eliza. Fulwar reportedly “did not bother to read anything of Emma except the first and last chapters, because he had heard it was not interesting” (see Jane Austen’s Letters (1995), pp.524-525).

Literature

Garside and Schöwerling 1818:19; Gilson A9; Keynes 9; Sadleir 62e

Catalogue Note

Austen's final two novels were published posthumously in 1818, although Northanger Abbey had actually been drafted fifteen years earlier with the working title 'Susan',  which was only abandoned when another novel with of the same name appeared in 1809. Austen's manuscript had been sold to publisher Richard Crosby, but for some reason remained unpublished, and it was only after the publication of Emma that Henry arranged to buy it back. It is assumed that Austen wrote the statement which precedes the text shortly after this, in which she observes, "That any bookseller should think it worth while to purchase what he did not think it worth while to publish seems extraordinary."

It was finally brought out after Austen's death in July 1817 alongside Persuasion, which was completed by Austen over the summer of 1816, shortly before she was forced to stop writing due to ill health. The 'Biographical Notice of the Author' written by her brother Henry. 

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations

|
London