629
629
A MINIATURE GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE INCENSE BURNER, GUI
EARLY QING DYNASTY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
629
A MINIATURE GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE INCENSE BURNER, GUI
EARLY QING DYNASTY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A MINIATURE GOLD-SPLASHED BRONZE INCENSE BURNER, GUI
EARLY QING DYNASTY
well cast with loop handles, supported on a splayed foot, the bronze patinated to a rich golden-brown colour, the surface with liberal splashes of gold, the base cast with a six-character apocryphal Xuande mark
8.5 cm, 3 3/8  in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

The origin of gilt-bronze splash remains a source of speculation. Gerard Tsang and Hugh Moss in Arts from the Scholar’s Studio, Hong Kong, 1986, p. 184, mention that the popularity of this surface decoration was fostered by Xuande bronzes of the Ming dynasty where the appearance of the gilt splashes was caused by the uneven surface patination of the vessel. Some scholars have linked gilt-splashed decoration on bronzes to qingbai and Longquan wares of the Song, Yuan and Ming dynasties. Robert Mowry in his work on the Phoenix Art Museum exhibition China’s Renaissance in Bronze, Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, 1993, p. 169, mentions the appearance of fine paper enlivened with flecks of gold and silver from the early 15th century and suggests that this ‘might have also played a role in the creation of such abstract decoration, either directly inspiring those who designed the bronzes or indirectly moulding taste to appreciate objects sprinkled with gold and silver’.

Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong