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China in print and on paper, including the Library of Bernard Hanotiau and the Floyd Sully Collection

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Gingell, Dr William Raymond.
A GROUP OF MANUSCRIPT TRANSLATIONS FROM THE CHINESE:
"Translation History of Amoy", with contents of the 16 volumes of the text, and full translations of volumes 1, 2, 3 (two copies, one incomplete), 4 (possibly incomplete) and 7, comprising translations of a range of texts relating to aspects of the history of the city, especially military history, naval defences, and customs, with explanatory notes Chinese characters and transliterations, c.300 pages, 4to 

[with:] 17 further manuscript volumes of translations of various Chinese texts (all 8vo except where stated): "Appelations of Graduates - Names of documents [sent] to the Throne", explanations of Chinese terms, with characters, 12 pages; "Imperial Commands, edicts, and Memorial", various Imperial decrees from 1852-53 on the revolt of the "Short Knife Society", militia, currency, and army pay, 29 pages, 1853; "An Epitome of the events which occurred at Foochow during the year 53. Anonymous. Written in a satirical style. 1853", an account of the Taiping Rebellion at Fuzhou with explanatory notes by Gingell, 33 pages; "An Elegy on the Virtuous government of Wang. Lieut Governor [.] formed on quotations from the four Books", 12 pages, 1853; "Inscription on an antique jar. Thesis written by Wang Po aged 14 years", with a commentary, 49 pages, 1853; "3 Memorials by Viceroy of Fokien 1 Loss of Amoy &c 2 Reinforce guards for Keany Lu &c 3 Capture of Amoy", 32 pages, 1853; "Memorials Recapture of Amoy", four official reports on the suppression of the "Little Knife" rebellion, 28 pages, 1853; "Royal announcement declaring the election of an Empress", 16 pages, 1853; "Royal Announcement by the present Emperor of China on the Interment of the late Dowager Queen mother of the late Emperor Taou Kwang", with explanatory notes, 23 pages, 1853; "Two narratives. The capture of Nanking by the insurgents", 37 pages, 1854; "Forms of Ceremonial observed by the Civil & Military of China", with Chinese characters, transliterations and definitions, 40 pages, oblong 8vo; "Forms of Ceremonial suitable to be adopted in the Fokien Province on the occasion of the Dowager Queen having ascended to a distance on her long journey", text on rectos with notes on facing versos, 34 pages, 4to; four texts, "A Proclamation issued by the Leo Tae or Literary Governor", with notes, "The Feast of Lanterns", with definitions of Chinese characters, "The Dragon Boat Feast", with definitions of Chinese characters, and "Monumental Tablet to Fanchin Moo formerly viceroy of Fokien Province", altogether 25 pages, 4to, 1850-53; "King siu Luk or Chinese Creed A narrative or Transcribed record on the subject of Belief enlarged and revised Foochow 1844", 71 pages, oblong 4to, 1852; "9 Ranks of Officers", with explanation of Chinese characters, 12 pages, blanks, 4to; "Chronological list of the Emperors and Kings of China, beginning with the now reigning monarch 1853", with Chinese characters, transliterations, and extensive notes, 67 pages, oblong 8vo, 1853; "Translation of Tablet in the Monastery. Koo Than", with Chinese characters and explanatory notes, 29 pages, 1853

[also with:] letter by R.B. Jackson, HM Consul at Foochow, to Gingell, communicating Lord Palmerston's favourable opinion of Gingell's translation of the History of Amoy, 2 pages, 15 November 1849; photograph of the British Consulate, Amoy, 1868, by F. Schoenke (65 x 100mm.); reverse chronological table of dates with Chinese calendar years and the Western Christian calendar from 1853 AD to 2637 BC, 5 pages, folio; offprint of a translation of a Chinese poem, 1853


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Catalogue Note

William Raymond Gingell studied medicine before joining the East India Company as a surgeon. He went to China in 1842 at the end of the First Opium War and spent the rest of his working life in the country, dying in Hankow, where he was Consul, in 1863. He was an excellent linguist and in the early 1850s, when these manuscripts were written, he was Interpreter to the British Consulate in Amoy. He published volumes of translations from Chinese in 1842 and 1852, but the current texts are not found in either of these volumes.

China in print and on paper, including the Library of Bernard Hanotiau and the Floyd Sully Collection

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London