175
175
A fine illuminated Qur'an, copied by Suleyman al-Uskudari, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1087 AH/1676 AD
Estimate
120,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 197,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
175
A fine illuminated Qur'an, copied by Suleyman al-Uskudari, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1087 AH/1676 AD
Estimate
120,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 197,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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A fine illuminated Qur'an, copied by Suleyman al-Uskudari, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1087 AH/1676 AD
Arabic manuscript on paper, 340 leaves plus 5 flyleaves, 13 lines to the page, written in neat naskh script in black ink, verses separated by segmented gold florets pointed in blue and red, surah headings in white thuluth script against foliated gold-ground panels, catchwords, finely-illuminated marginal devices of varying designs, double page illuminated frontispiece composed of a thick border of interlacing flowers and split-palmettes emanating blue sprays, text in cloud bands with strap-work inner borders, later tan morocco binding with gold rococo decoration, with flap  
27 by 19cm.
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Catalogue Note

Suleyman al-Uskudari

Suleyman Uskudari (d.circa 1686) studied under Mehmed Efendi of Belgrade, and went on to teach calligraphy at the Topkapi Palace. A further Qur'an, written a year earlier than the present example, is in the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, Istanbul (412), and published in M. Ugur Derman, Ninety-Nine Qur'an Manuscripts from Istanbul, Istanbul, 2010, pp.144-7.

Another Qur’an by the scribe, written approximately two years after the present manuscript, is now in a private collection in Istanbul, published in N.F. Safwat, Understanding Calligraphy, The Ottoman Contribution - from the Collection of Cengiz Çetindoğan, Part One, London, 2014, pp.66-69, no.7. 

The illumination of both the Qur'ans mentioned above share with the present a well-spaced and evenly-structured calligraphic page, as well as a particular style of illumination, employing a fairly pale palette, with an inventive array of designs for the marginal devices.

Arts of the Islamic World

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London