183
183

COLLECTION PARTICULIÈRE EUROPÉENNE

Importante boîte couverte en laque bicolore sculptée Dynastie Qing, fin de l'époque Qianlong-époque Jiaqing
AN IMPORTANT CARVED POLYCHROME LACQUER BOX AND COVER, QING DYNASTY, LATE QIANLONG/JIAQING PERIOD, WITH CONTEMPORANEOUS GOLD MOUNTS AND DEDICATION 
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT
183

COLLECTION PARTICULIÈRE EUROPÉENNE

Importante boîte couverte en laque bicolore sculptée Dynastie Qing, fin de l'époque Qianlong-époque Jiaqing
AN IMPORTANT CARVED POLYCHROME LACQUER BOX AND COVER, QING DYNASTY, LATE QIANLONG/JIAQING PERIOD, WITH CONTEMPORANEOUS GOLD MOUNTS AND DEDICATION 
Estimate
150,000250,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts d'Asie / Asian Art

|
Paris

Importante boîte couverte en laque bicolore sculptée Dynastie Qing, fin de l'époque Qianlong-époque Jiaqing
AN IMPORTANT CARVED POLYCHROME LACQUER BOX AND COVER, QING DYNASTY, LATE QIANLONG/JIAQING PERIOD, WITH CONTEMPORANEOUS GOLD MOUNTS AND DEDICATION 
de forme chantournée, le couvercle délicatement sculpté en relief de fleurs, feuilles et cosse de lotus dans un étang, les côtés finement sculptés de frises à motifs hexagonaux contenant des fleurettes, le dessous et l'intérieur de la boîte laqués noir, les bords avec une délicate et riche monture européenne autour de 1830 en or rose et or jaune à décor de feuilles d'acanthes, le couvercle foncé à l'intérieur d'une plaque ovale en or portant l'inscription :

"Tabatière
faisant partie des présents envoyés
par l’Empereur de la Chine
à S.M. l’Empereur Napoleon à Ste. Helene,
et qui lui a servit jusqu’à sa mort.
Donnée par Mr. le Cte. de Montholon
à  Mr. le Cte. Balbi de Piovera"


11 cm, 4 1/4  in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Aisin Gioro Yongyan, the Jiaqing Emperor (r. 1796-1820) (by repute only and according to the inscription on the inside cover of the box).
Napoléon Bonaparte, Empereur Napoléon Ier (1769-1821) (by repute only and according to the inscription on the inside cover of the box).
Charles-Tristan, Marquis de Montholon, Général de Montholon (1783-1853) (by repute only and according to the inscription on the inside cover of the box).
Jacques-François-Marie, Marquis de Piovera, Comte de Balbi (by repute only and according to the inscription on the inside cover of the box).
Thence by descent through the family of the Comte de Balbi to a member of the Thurn und Taxis family (by repute).
Thence by direct descent to the present owner.

Catalogue Note

Two carved polychrome lacquer boxes of the same size and design formerly in the imperial collection, are illustrated in Lifting the Spirit and Body: The Art and Culture of Snuff Bottles, Taipei, 2012, IV-055 and IV-056 where the catalogue note refers to them as snuff boxes.
The present box was formerly in the private collection of Mrs. Piera Tassis Fabbri, descendant of the Princely House of Thurn and Taxis, famous for having founded the Imperial Reichspost (German Imperial Mail) in the late 15th century. The imperial postal services remained a monopoly of the family for over three centuries until the end of the Empire in 1806, but continued on as a prosperous private company until the second half of the 19th century.

The Longwood snuff box

Upon their return to Paris in 1821, after six years of exil on the island of Saint Helena alongside Napoleon (Fig. 1), the General Count Charles-Tristan de Montholon (Fig. 2) and his wife Albine rejoice to see their friends again. Amongst them, Jacques François Balbi, son of the Countess of Balbi, mistress and favourite of the Count of Provence, future King of France Louis XVIII, in Versailles, before emigrating to Coblenz.

J.F. Balbi was Charles de Montholon’s witness to his extravagant wedding to Albine de Vassal on July 2nd 1821 at the Draveil city hall, a small rural township in the county of Seine-et-Oise. At the time, Montholon was still an ambassador for Napoleon at Würzburg and the Emperor was opposed to his marriage to a young woman twice divorced and “not of impeccable reputation”. Madly in love, Montholon disobeyed orders and bribed the mayor of the township to commit several infractions to the Civil Code. Balbi was his accomplice. The Empire’s police force was not to be underestimated, and Napoleon was informed while in Moscou under siege : Montholon was dismissed from office, and the mayor of Draveil was removed and sentenced to one month in prison. This would not prevent Montholon, three years later, from becoming his aid on the Saint Helena camp, and Albine to become Napoleon’s mistress!

Renewing with his friend Balbi, Charles de Montholon, offered him this superb Chinese lacquer box, which he possibly brought back from Saint Helena. At that time (before the construction of the Suez Canal), Saint Helena, dubbed L’Auberge de l’Atlantique (the Inn of the Atlantic), was an important fuel stop on the sea route between Cape Town and Europe. Over nine hundred ships would make a stopover each year. Travellers from China, carrying works of art made in this mysterious far-away land, were frequent. Since pieces with history had added valuable, it is possible that Montholon told his friend that this box was part of an ensemble of presents offered by the Emperor of China Jiaqing to Napoleon and that the latter used it as a snuff box. Flattered by such a present, the Count of Balbi apposed on the inside of the cover a gilt plaque relating its illustrious provenance (Fig. 3 ), with unfortunately a spelling mistake (to “a servit”), leaving us to think that the inscription was perhaps made in a foreign country. The fine gold hinged mount which gives it its specificity and enhances its beauty was probably made in Italy in the 1830s. So how did this snuff box [1] reach Longwood?

During the First Empire, France did not hold any diplomatic ties with China, and commerce in the Indian Ocean was ruled by the British Empire, masters of the seas. Napoleon only knew about contemporary China through – very critical – records of the Macartney mission [2], a best-seller in the 1800s of which one copy was in the Longwood library. On the other side, the Chinese only knew of Napoleon’s reputation: that of a great conqueror in Europe, much like Gengis Khan or Timur [3].

In April 1817, the Honorable John Elphinstone, supercargo of the East India Company, whose brother was treated upon Napoleon’s orders after being seriously injured the day before the Waterloo battle, sent Asian works of art to Saint Helena as a gesture of gratitude. The list included: a superb ivory chess set, a mother-of-pearl box of tokens, two finely carved porcelain baskets. But no lacquer box.

Early June 1817, an English traveller named Manning arrived on board a ship from China, where he visited Tibet and met the Great Lama, a very bright seven year old child. He wore a Tibetan robe and bore a long black beard. Napoleon wished to meet this strange traveller. Without Hudson Lowe’s consent, the meeting took place on June 5th at the house of the General Bertrand, and Napoleon declared himself quite disappointed by their conversation that did not teach him much. According to the General Bertrand, Manning offered him presents that he describes in his Cahiers as “junk (tea, Indian fans, etc.)” and on June 11th, Bertrand relates the arrival of four other crates from Mr. Manning, intended to the Emperor at Longwood House in Saint Helena (Fig. 4) and containing “tea, tobacco, coffee, Chinese fabric made of hemp, and two feather fans”.

In History of the captivity of Napoleon at St. Helena , written in 1844, Montholon supplies more information : « June 13th. The Emperor had a long walk in the garden and, upon his return, he summoned us [his officers] to distribute presents that the traveller from Tibet sent him. A tea box was especially remarkable by the fineness of its craftsmanship. The Emperor gave it to the General Gourgaud (Fig. 5) as he said: “Send this to your mother with my regards. When it will be known in Paris that she possesses a relic from Saint Helena, everyone will rush to see it” ». Surely jealous of the preference granted to Gourgaud [4], Montholon did not mention which present he received. It could very well have been the lacquer box that he later offered to the Count of Balbi. 

However, Gourgaud relates a slightly different version in his journal: « June 13th. It’s already 7 pm when I see him [the Emperor]. He is busy handing out presents from the bearded man, and gives me ten yards of Chinese fabric made of hemp. Then, he gives the order to bring me two boxes of tea which were initially kept by him. I will send them to my mother. Everyone in Paris will know, everyone will want to drink tea from Saint Helena ». Tea box or box of tea?

Let us finally take a look at the mention « Emperor of China » under the cover! Did Montholon embellish the story or did Balbi extrapolate? This question brings us to recall the Amherst mission. Indeed, wishing to establish commerce in China like it did in India, the British Empire sent Lord Macartney on a mission to Beijing in 1793 to negotiate a diplomatic and commercial treaty. It ended as a complete failure. In 1816, the Empire tried once again, sending Lord Amherst, along with two dozen diplomats. Like his predecessor and upon his instructions, Amherst refused to bow to the local custom of kowtow, which stipulates that an ambassador should bow down nine times with the face against the ground in front of the Son of Heaven. Disembarked in Pei Ho, he was not authorized to go to Beijing and did not meet the Jiaqing Emperor. On his way back, he stopped at Saint Helena on June 28th 1817, less than a month after the traveller from Tibet. Napoleon, who believed that an ambassador should bow to local customs, desired to meet Amherst. The visit was delicate to plan but finally, Napoleon greeted him and they had a two-hour face to face. He asked questions about China, its laws and customs, religion, and charged him to convey to London his disapproval of Hudson Lowe’s behaviour towards him. We could contemplate the possibility of Napoleon receiving a present brought back from China by Lord Amherst. But this theory is not supported by any documented proof, contrary to the previous theory. Was it during this meeting with Lord Amherst that Napoleon, startled to learn that China’s population had already exceeded three hundred million people, pronounced the famous sentence : “Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the World”. In fact, his sentence was pronounced circa 1920 by Lenin who is thought to have found it in an unpublished story or correspondence while conducting research at the British Library during his exile in London. The source has not been confirmed since [5] but the phrase became famous in 1973 when it was used by Alain Peyrefitte as the title of his major book on China under Mao Zedong.

Today, opening this box from Saint Helena, aren’t we witnessing Napoleon’s prophesy from true: hundreds of millions of Chinese men emerging, well awakened and ready to shake the world economy?

Jacques Macé

[1] According to the inventory established after his death by Louis Marchand, Napoleon possessed no less than thirty seven snuff bottles and box, but none in Chinese lacquer.

[2] Narrative of the British Embassy to China, in the years 1792,1793, and 1794, containing circumstances of the Embaassy, with accounts of the country towns, cities, etc, London, 1796.

[3]  Comte Emmanuel de Las Cases, Mémorial de Sainte-Hélène, Tuesday 26th March 1816.

[4] The animosity between Montholon and Gourgaud left a mark in the history of the Emperor’s captivity, until the departure of the latter in 1818 to prevent a duel. This is anecdote is yet another demonstration of this.

[5] Perhaps Lenin ripped out the page ?

La tabatière de Longwood

A leur retour à Paris en 1821, après leurs six années d’exil sur l’ile de Sainte-Hélène en compagnie de l’Empereur Napoléon 1er, le général-comte Charles-Tristan de Montholon et son épouse Albine retrouvent avec grand plaisir leurs amis. Parmi ceux-ci, Jacques François Balbi, fils de la comtesse de Balbi, maitresse et favorite à Versailles, puis en émigration à Coblenz, du comte de Provence, futur roi Louis XVIII.

 J.F.Balbi avait été l’un des témoins de Charles de Montholon lors du rocambolesque mariage de ce dernier avec Albine de Vassal le 2 juillet 1812 à la mairie de Draveil, petite commune rurale de Seine-et-Oise. En effet, Montholon était alors ambassadeur de Napoléon à Würzburg et l’Empereur s’était opposé à son mariage avec une jeune femme deux fois divorcée et « dont la réputation n’était pas intacte ». Follement amoureux, Montholon passa outre et soudoya le maire de la commune qui commit plusieurs infractions au Code civil. Balbi fut son complice. La police de l’Empire était bien faite et Napoléon, de mauvaise humeur, en fut informé dans Moscou incendié : Montholon fut démis de ses fonctions, le maire de Draveil limogé et condamné à un mois de prison. Ceci n’empêcha pas Montholon de se retrouver trois ans plus tard aide de camp à Sainte-Hélène et Albine la dernière maîtresse de Napoléon !

Renouant avec son ami Balbi, Charles de Montholon, lui offre cette superbe boite en laque de Chine qu’il aurait ramenée de Sainte-Hélène. A cette époque (avant l’ouverture du canal de Suez), Sainte-Hélène, surnommée L’Auberge de l’Atlantique, constituait une importante escale de ravitaillement sur la route maritime entre Le Cap et l’Europe. Plus de neuf cents navires y faisaient escale chaque année. Le passage de voyageurs revenant de Chine, chargés d’objets en provenance de cette civilisation mystérieuse, y était fréquent. Toutefois, un objet d’art ayant d’autant plus de valeur qu’il possède une histoire, Montholon aurait raconté à son ami que cette boite faisait partie d’un lot de présents offert par l’empereur de Chine Jiaqing à Napoléon et que ce dernier l’avait un temps utilisé en tabatière. Flatté d’un tel présent, le comte Balbi fit apposer sur le fond du couvercle une plaque expliquant cette illustre origine, avec malheureusement une faute d’orthographe (a servit) qui laisse supposer que la gravure a été effectuée à l’étranger. C’est vraisemblablement aussi en Italie dans les années 1830 que la boite a été dotée d’une double et fine monture-charnière en or qui lui donne une spécificité et en rehausse l’éclat. Comment cette boite ou tabatière[1] a-t-elle pu parvenir à Longwood ?

Durant le Premier Empire, La France n’avait pas entretenu de relation diplomatique avec la Chine et le commerce dans l’Océan Indien était dominé par la Grande-Bretagne, maîtresse des mers. Napoléon ne connaissait guère la Chine contemporaine que par le récit, très critique, de la mission Macartney[2], best-seller des années 1800 dont un exemplaire se trouvait dans la bibliothèque de Longwood. De leur côté, les Chinois ne connaissaient de Napoléon que le nom, celui d’un grand conquérant en Europe comme celui de Gengis Khan ou de Tamerlan en Asie[3].

En avril 1817, l’Honorable John Elphinstone, directeur de la Compagnie des Indes à Bombay, dont Napoléon avait fait soigner le frère James grièvement blessé la veille de Waterloo, fit parvenir à Sainte-Hélène en geste de reconnaissance des objets d’art asiatique. Nous en connaissons la liste : un superbe jeu d’échecs en ivoire, une boite de jetons en nacre, deux belles corbeilles en porcelaine ciselée. Mais parmi eux, pas de boite en laque.

Début juin 1817, arriva à bord d’un navire venant de Chine un voyageur anglais nommé Manning, qui avait visité le Tibet et même rencontré le Grand Lama, alors enfant de sept ans fort intelligent. Il portait une robe tibétaine et une longue barbe noire. Napoléon souhaita rencontrer ce voyageur original. Faute d’accord d’Hudson Lowe, la rencontre eut lieu le 5 juin au domicile du général Bertrand et Napoléon se déclara d’ailleurs déçu d’une conversation qui ne lui apprit pas grand-chose. Selon le général Bertrand, Manning fit remettre à celui-ci des cadeaux qu’il qualifie, dans ses Cahiers, de « rogatons (thé, éventails de l’Inde, etc.) » et, le 11 juin, Bertrand cite l’arrivée de quatre autres caisses de M. Manning, destinées à l’Empereur et contenant : « thé, tabac, café, toile de Chine faite avec de l’herbe, et deux éventails en plume ».

Montholon dans ses Récits de la Captivité, écrits en 1844, complète utilement l’information : «  13 juin. L’Empereur s’est promené longtemps dans le jardin et, en rentrant, nous [ses officiers] a tous fait appeler pour nous distribuer les présents que le voyageur au Tibet venait de lui envoyer. Une boite à thé était surtout remarquable par la finesse de son travail. L’Empereur la donna au général Gourgaud, en lui disant : ‘‘Envoyez-la de ma part à votre mère. Quand on saura à Paris qu’elle possède une relique de Sainte-Hélène, tout le monde accourra pour la voir’’ ». Montholon, sans doute jaloux de la préférence accordée à Gourgaud[4], n’a pas cru bon de préciser le cadeau dont il a lui-même bénéficié. Il pourrait très logiquement s’agir de la boite en laque qu’il offrira plus tard au comte Balbi.

Gourgaud nous donne cependant dans son Journal une version légèrement différente : « 13 juin. Ce n’est qu’à 7 heures du soir que je le [l’Empereur] vois. Il s’occupe à distribuer les dons de l’homme à barbe et me donne dix yards d’une toile de Chine faite avec de l’herbe. Ensuite, il donne l’ordre que l’on me porte deux boites de thé qu’il avait primitivement gardées pour lui. Je les enverrai à ma mère, tout Paris le saura, chacun voudra boire du thé de Sainte-Hélène ». Boite à thé ou boite de thé ?

Explorons enfin la mention « l’empereur de Chine » sur le couvercle ! Est-ce Montholon qui a enjolivé, ou Balbi qui a extrapolé ? Cette question nous amène à évoquer la mission Amherst. En effet, souhaitant s’implanter en Chine comme elle l’avait fait en Inde, la Grande-Bretagne avait envoyé dès 1793 lord Macartney en mission à Pékin pour tenter de négocier un accord diplomatique et commercial. Ce fut un échec complet. Elle récidiva en 1816 avec la mission de lord Amherst, accompagné d’une vingtaine de diplomates. Comme son prédécesseur et selon ses instructions, Amherst refusa de se plier à la coutume du kowtow, prescrivant à un ambassadeur de se prosterner neuf fois le visage contre terre devant le Fils du Ciel. Débarqué à Pei Ho, il ne fut pas autorisé à aller à Pékin et ne rencontra pas l’empereur Jiaqing. Sur le chemin du retour, il s’arrêta à Sainte-Hélène le 28 juin 1817, moins d’un mois après le voyageur venant du Tibet. Napoléon, qui estimait pour sa part qu’un ambassadeur devait se plier aux coutumes locales, désirait fortement rencontrer Amherst et la visite fut délicate à organiser. Finalement, Napoléon reçut lord Amherst en tête-à-tête pendant près de deux heures ; il le questionna sur la Chine, ses lois et coutumes, la religion et le chargea de transmettre à Londres ses récriminations envers le comportement d’Hudson Lowe à son égard. Nous aurions pu envisager l’hypothèse de la remise à Napoléon par lord Amherst d’un souvenir de Chine, recueilli ensuite par Montholon. Mais cette hypothèse n’est pas étayée par une référence documentaire, à l’inverse de celle retenue ci-dessus. Est-ce au cours de cette entrevue avec lord Amherst que Napoléon, frappé de savoir que la Chine comportait déjà plus de trois cents millions d’habitants, prononça la sentence : « Laissons donc la Chine dormir car, quand la Chine s’éveillera, le monde tremblera ». En fait, cette phrase a été citée vers 1920 par Lénine qui l’aurait découverte dans un récit inédit ou une correspondance lors de ses recherches à la British Library durant son exil à Londres. La source n’a pas pu être ré-identifiée depuis[5] mais la phrase est devenue célèbre en 1973 quand elle a été reprise par Alain Peyrefitte en titre de son capital ouvrage sur la Chine de Mao Tsé-Toung.

Aujourd’hui, en ouvrant cette boite venue de Sainte-Hélène, ne voyons-nous pas se réaliser la prédiction de Napoléon, des centaines de millions de Chinois en surgissant, bien éveillés et bien décidés à faire trembler l’économie mondiale ?

Jacques Macé

[1] D’après l’inventaire après décès, établi par le valet de chambre et exécuteur testamentaire Louis Marchand, Napoléon ne possédait pas moins de trente-sept tabatières, minutieusement décrites, mais aucune en laque de Chine.

[2] Relation de l’Ambassade de Lord Macartney en Chine, 1792-1794, avec la description des mœurs des Chinois, de l’intérieur du pays, des villes, etc. Nombreuses éditions.

[3]  Comte Emmanuel de Las Cases, Mémorial de Sainte-Hélène, date du mardi 26 mars 1816.

[4] L’animosité entre Montholon et Gourgaud a marqué l’histoire de la Captivité, jusqu’au départ du second en 1818 pour éviter un duel. Nous en avons encore ici une démonstration

[5] Lénine a peut-être emporté la page ?

Arts d'Asie / Asian Art

|
Paris