Lot 1
  • 1

A guard dozes at night, a fragment from the Hamzanama, Mughal, circa 1560-75

Estimate
6,000 - 8,000 GBP
bidding is closed

Description

  • Gouache and ink on paper
gouache heightened with gold on cloth, laid down on an album page with borders of blue, gold and pink, framed

Provenance

R. Burton, London, 1967
Sven Gahlin, London
Kasmin Ltd., London, 1968
Sotheby's London, 15 July 1970, lot 1970
C. Andrew Hewson, London
Acquired in 2010

Literature

Seyller 2002, pp.278-9, no.R.173

Condition

In fairly good overall condition, some paint loss, mainly around figure in upper section, as viewed.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

This scene of a guard dozing at night is a fragment from the famous Hamzanama, the monumental series of approximately 1,400 large-scale cloth paintings made for Emperor Akbar between about 1560 and 1575 that illustrated the legendary exploits of Amir Hamza, the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad (for summaries of the various theories on the dating of the Hamzanama see Leach 1986, p.39, n.9; Stronge 2002, p.177, n.35; Losty in Beach, Fischer and Goswamy 2011, vol.I, pp.72-3). The scale of this project was unprecedented in Indian art, both in terms of the size of the illustrations (each page measures approximately 70 by 55cm, even without the now mostly lost borders) and in terms of sheer number of illustrations. For a thorough study and illustrations of the majority of the surviving pages see Seyller 2002.