63
63

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
VÉNUS SANS BRAS
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 1,210,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
63

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
VÉNUS SANS BRAS
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 1,210,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York

Aristide Maillol
1861 - 1944
VÉNUS SANS BRAS
Inscribed with the artist’s monogram, inscribed with the foundry mark E. Godard Fondeur Paris and numbered 1/6
Bronze
Height: 69 1/4 in.
176 cm
Conceived in 1922 and cast at a later date.
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The authenticity of this work was confirmed by the late Dina Vierny.

Provenance

Dina Vierny, Paris

Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 1995

Exhibited

Tokyo, Mitsukoshi Art Museum, Shinjuku; Hokkaido, Hakodate Museum of Art; Kagawa, Takamatsu City Museum of Art; Akita Museum of Modern Art; Chiba Prefectural Museum of Art; Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art; Hyogo, Himeji City Museum of Art, Maillol, 1994-95, no. 47, illustrated in the catalogue

Literature

Bertrand Lorquin, Aristide Maillol, London, 1995, n.n., another cast illustrated p. 108

Catalogue Note

Maillol's focus on the female torso dominated his creative imagination, clearly bringing him much sensual pleasure. "This is the best part," he said, caressing the lines of the figure's right flank.  "It is very difficult to do a standing woman" (quoted in B. Lorquin, Maillol, New York, 1995, p. 107). Waldemar Georges explained that these figures, despite the lack of arms, Maillol’s torso “are not amputated, decapitated busts. They are organisms and are perhaps more complete than anatomies which imitate nature with its flaws, failings, and imperfections” (quoted in B. Lorquin, op. cit.). While the physical features of Maillol's female forms evolved throughout his career, the essential feminine qualities that the he expressed remained consistent.

Vénus sans bras is a clear reflection of Maillol’s captivation with illustrating the beauty of the female form. Maillol adored the famous Venus de Milo in the Louvre all the more because it was preserved without its arms, which he thought "would add nothing to its beauty; on the contrary they would probably detract from it" (quoted in B. Lorquin, Maillol, op. cit., p. 112). According to the late Dina Vierny, who issued a certificate for this work and also owned the work for many years, Vénus sans bras was cast by the Godard foundry in an edition of six numbered bronzes, plus two artist's proofs.

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York