Lot 408
  • 408

Egon Schiele

Estimate
50,000 - 70,000 USD
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Description

  • Egon Schiele
  • Ein Hauptmann der k. u. k. Armee (A Captain of The Imperial and Royal Army)
  • Signed Egon Schiele and dated 1916 (lower left)
  • Pencil on paper
  • 18 7/8 by 12 3/8 in.
  • 47.9 by 31.4 cm

Provenance

Galerie Würthle, Vienna
Private Collection, Europe (acquired from the above in the 1980s)
Thence by descent

Exhibited

Vienna, Galerie 10, Von Schiele bis Leherb, circa 1970, illustrated in the catalogue

Literature

Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: The Complete Works, New York, 1990, no. 1836, illustrated p. 562

Condition

Executed on cream wove paper. The sheet is a little dirty and time-darkened, and some light creases are present, including a horizontal crease running horizontally under the drawn composition. The extreme outer edges have been reinforced and a couple very minor repairs and very minor 1/8 inch tears are present. Some very faint and minor signs of foxing are scattered throughout but the sheet is otherwise fine. Overall the work is in good condition.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

Ein Hauptmann der k. u. k. Armee is one of a series of military-related portraits that Schiele produced during his compulsory enlistment in 1916. As Jane Kallir writes, “It is significant that Schiele was not among the vast majority—including Oskar Kokoschka, who enlisted almost immediately—that greeted the outbreak of war with militaristic fervor” (Jane Kallier, op. cit., p. 193). His portraits from this period, evocative images of officers and prisoners alike, reflect a sympathetic, humanist sentiment that had begun to permeate his wartime oeuvre.