Lot 149
  • 149

Barbara Hepworth

Estimate
200,000 - 300,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Barbara Hepworth
  • Involute II
  • Numbered 6/6
  • Bronze
  • Height: 16 3/4 in.
  • 42.6 cm

Provenance

The artist's studio
Gimpel Fils Ltd., London 
Private Collection, Bermuda (acquired from the above on November 9, 1965, and sold: Sotheby's, New York, May 9, 2007, lot 301)
Acquired at the above sale 

Literature

Josef Paul Hodin, Barbara Hepworth, Neuchâtel, 1961, no. 218, illustration of another cast n.p.

Condition

Very good condition. Minor surface dirt. There are several white accretions in the deeper recesses of the interior of the spiral and underside. These white flecks may well be removable by a sculpture conservator. The patina on the interior of the spiral transitions from light green on the lower half to a warm brown on the upper, this is inherent to the casting process.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

Involute II is one of a number of smaller sculptures conceived by Hepworth in early 1956. Her burgeoning international reputation initiated several important changes in her working practices, chief among these the use of assistants to help her in the preparatory stages of creating sculptures, and the carving of plaster specifically for casting in bronze. This work reflects these changes in technique, and in contrast to the earlier and larger Involute, the surfaces of the present work are heavily textured, highlighting the uneven nature of the original plaster cast and giving the sculpture a distinctively organic feel.

This elemental form reflects Hepworth’s interest in the natural world, and the spiralling lines of the piece seem reminiscent of the membranes of snail shells. It was through the echoing of these forms that Hepworth sought to evoke a sense of the natural world and root her works in the surrounding landscape. As she commented following her move to St. Ives, “landscape…has a very deep effect on me, developing all my ideas about the relationship of the human figure in landscape—sculpture in landscape” (Herbert Read, Art and Society, 1952, section 4).