134
134

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE BRITISH COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
JEUNE FILLE LISANT
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 1,181,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
134

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE BRITISH COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
JEUNE FILLE LISANT
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 1,181,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841-1919
JEUNE FILLE LISANT
signed Renoir (lower right)
oil on canvas
30 by 20.4cm., 11 3/4 by 8in.
Painted circa 1895.
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This work will be included in the Renoir Catalogue critique being prepared by the Wildenstein Institute from the François Daulte, Durand-Ruel, Venturi, Vollard and Wildenstein archives.

Provenance

Galerie Raeber, Basel (until 1938)
Private Collection, Switzerland (sale: Sotheby’s, London, 3rd December 1975, lot 3)
Private Collection, United Kingdom (purchased at the above sale)
A gift from the above to the present owner

Literature

Ambroise Vollard, Tableaux, Pastels et Dessins de Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paris, 1918, vol. II, illustrated p. 116
Guy-Patrice & Michel Dauberville, Renoir, Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles 1895 - 1902, Paris, 2009, vol. III, no. 2192, illustrated p. 279

Catalogue Note

Young women reading and other domestic feminine activities dominate the scenes of social life that Renoir painted in the 1890s. Jeune fille lisant, painted circa 1895, exemplifies the fluid, soft brushwork and nuanced palette that is so typical of Renoir's style at the turn of the century. Moving away from cooler colours, firm contours, and the clear distinction between figure and background that characterises his portraits from the mid-1880s, Renoir organised his compositions with correlated colours on the canvas to achieve a sense of formal unity. The tangible forms in this work are surrounded by a warm, almost translucent atmosphere that the painter created with the creamy, expressive brushstrokes and vibrant colours of his mature style.

The modest background that surrounds the young woman is imbued with a sense of bourgeois calm and comfort: she is absorbed in her book, and sits tranquilly on a soft armchair, still wearing her hat. Renoir emphasises the lyrical quality of colour, testing warmer hues of red and pink offset by cooler greens and blues to describe a calm scene of domesticity, intimacy and quietude. An ennobler of the mundane, Renoir painted for visual delight, immersing himself in his modern, contradictory world, and emerging only with images of pleasure.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London