Lot 3330
  • 3330

A DOCUMENTARY BRONZE RITUAL VESSEL, DOU MING DYNASTY, HONGZHI PERIOD, DATED IN ACCORDANCE TO 1492

Estimate
50,000 - 70,000 HKD
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Description

  • bronze
the deep rounded body supported on a stem and flared foot, the exterior of the cup cast with four quadrants, one cast with an inscription and a cyclical date, the other three enclosing an archaistic motif against a leiwen ground, the stem divided into four further quadrants, each enclosing a wave pattern below a key-fret band, the footrim bordered with a further key-fret band, the bronze patinated to a smooth dark brown patina

Literature

Ulrich Hausmann, Anmerkungen zur Problematik des Archaismus der späteren chinesischen Bronzen, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ostasiatische Kunst, Mitteilungen Nr. 5, Berlin, 1993, pl. 9.

Condition

The vessel had been dented, and is a slightly misshapen circle at the mouth. General surface wear and minor chips to the foot and the mouth, otherwise good condition.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

The inscription, integrally cast to the vessel and therefore indisputably contemporary to the piece, reads:

'Ritual altar vessel, known as She Jitan, for Shunde Province' (Guangdong). 

Governor Wu Ting Zhu had it commissioned'.

A common feature of the many archaistic bronze pieces of early Ming date is that the archaism displayed is often very restrained and subtle. This is particularly apparent on the current vessel. For a related example, see another vessel of archaistic dou form, dated with an incised inscription to 1485, and also without a cover, sold at Christie's London, 22nd July 1981, lot 16.