Lot 322
  • 322

Alberto Giacometti

Estimate
30,000 - 40,000 GBP
bidding is closed

Description

  • Alberto Giacometti
  • Epreuve pour Isabel
  • plaster 
  • height: 30cm., 11¾in.

Provenance

Private Collection, France
Sale: Calmels-Chambre-Cohen, Paris, 30th November 2001, lot 61
Purchased at the above sale by the late owner

Condition

Plaster cast with natural inconsistencies, relating to its execution. Some dirt in the crevices, and some spots of studio stains and discolouration noticeable on her nose, right eye and forehead. Otherwise this work is in good overall condition.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

It was rare for Giacometti to pursue a project without making successive modifications to his original conception, and his Paris studio on the rue Hippolyte-Maindron was filled with a profusion of studies and working models which he continually rearranged and revisited. The present work is one such example, and is recognised as a working model which, although it was never realised in bronze, represents an important intermediary stage between conception of Isabel I and Isabel II and gives an insight into the very heart of Giacometti’s creative process. He was well known to work through various incarnations of each of his sculptures, allowing the form to emerge and develop over time through various metamorphoses and recompositions, and this plaster is closely related to the plasters for both Isabel I (1936, fig. 1) and more abstract Isabel II (circa 1937-39, fig. 2), which are held in the collection of the Fondation Alberto and Annette Giacometti. As such, this work is of importance not only as an object in itself, but as a historical record of the artist’s process which connects us with the most personal and intimate aspects of his studio practice. As Véronique Wiesinger explains, ‘examining these artefacts, their evolution, their trajectory, their traces, allows us … to restore a fraction of the movement and energy that produced the works and to better understand the magnetic pull Giacometti’s art continues to exert today’ (‘Giacometti’s Studio: A Site of Unbounded Adventure’ in The Studio of Alberto Giacometti (exhibition catalogue), Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2007-08, p. 28).