Lot 228
  • 228

Henri Lebasque

Estimate
80,000 - 120,000 GBP
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Description

  • Henri Lebasque
  • Dans le jardin de Montévrain
  • signed Lebasque  (lower right)
  • oil on canvas
  • 60.1 by 73cm., 23 5/8 by 28 3/4 in.

Provenance

Charles Comiot, Neuilly-sur-Seine (probably acquired directly from the artist in the 1920s)
Thence by descent to the present owner

Condition

The canvas is not lined. UV examination reveals two tiny spots of retouching, one to the left of the chair and one to the lower right part of the tree trunk. This work is in overall very good condition.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

This delightful, sun-drenched garden scene was painted in Montévrain on the banks of the river Marne, where Henri Lebasque lived from around 1900. Depicting the artist’s two young daughters at play, this work is a delightful example of Lebasque’s charming portrayals of intimate family life. Hailed as the painter of 'Joy and Light' by contemporary critics, Lebasque, like his friends in the Nabis group, favoured the tranquillity of domestic subject matter, focusing on depictions of his loved ones engaging in their daily routine. The light brushstrokes and masterful treatment of light attest to the influence of Camille Pissarro, under whom Lebasque had studied upon his arrival in Paris in 1885, while the pointillist application of colour recalls the work of  Georges Seurat and Paul Signac. As Lisa Banner points out: 'There is a sense of calm infused in Lebasque’s paintings which celebrates the fullness and richness of life. In his placid scenes of gardens and beaches, terraces and dinner tables, Lebasque portrays his family in particular, but in such a way that he appeals to a larger sense of family gathering and devotion.' (Introduction to Lebasque 1865 – 1937  (exhibition catalogue), Montgomery Gallery, San Francisco, 1986, p. 12). 
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