498
498

PROPERTY FROM THE MAKLER FAMILY COLLECTION

Anselm Kiefer
UNTERNEHMEN BARBAROSSA
Estimate
400,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 1,145,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
498

PROPERTY FROM THE MAKLER FAMILY COLLECTION

Anselm Kiefer
UNTERNEHMEN BARBAROSSA
Estimate
400,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 1,145,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Nov 2013 Contemporary Day

|
New York

Anselm Kiefer
B.1945
UNTERNEHMEN BARBAROSSA
titled
oil and acrylic on canvas
47 1/4 by 59 1/8 in. 120 by 150.2 cm.
Executed in 1975.
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Provenance

Marian Goodman Gallery, New York
Acquired by the present owner from the above in March 1994

Exhibited

Venice, Museo Correr, Anselm Kiefer, June - November 1997, p. 152, illustrated in color

Catalogue Note

Anselm Kiefer draws inspiration from the traumas of contemporary history and the complexities of humanity, most notably exploring the issue of German identity after the atrocities of World War II and the Holocaust. Unternehmen Barbarossa (Operation Barbarossa) was the code name for the German invasion of the Soviet Union launched in June 1941 which opened the Eastern front of the Second World War. The roughly four million German soldiers who invaded the vast Russian empire represent the largest military invasion in history, in terms of weaponry and manpower, as well as in casualties. Hitler’s plan to simultaneously challenge his enemies on two fronts was intended to divide and diminish the Allied forces and it initially met with success. Yet Operation Barbarossa eventually stalled at the outskirts of Moscow and through the counteroffensive, Russia became the most horrific theater of the war encompassing some of the most horrendous battles and losses seen by either side. So while the massive scale of Operation Barbarossa could represent the pinnacle of German might and pride, it’s equally massive casualties and suffering rendered it the most tragic phase of the war for the German and Soviet armies. The ultimate defeat of Hitler’s army in Russia was also a pivotal phase in the victory of Germany’s opponents.

Nov 2013 Contemporary Day

|
New York