Lot 63
  • 63

Mark Bradford

Estimate
600,000 - 800,000 USD
Sold
701,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Mark Bradford
  • Potable Water
  • billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, and additional mixed media on paper
  • 130 x 196 in. 330.2 x 497.8 cm.
  • Executed in 2005.

Provenance

Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York
Acquired by the present owner directly from the above in December 2005

Exhibited

Columbus, Wexner Center for the Arts, The Ohio State University; Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art; Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art; San Francisco, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Mark Bradford, May 2010 - May 2012, cat. no. 16,  pp. 152-153, illustrated in color

Catalogue Note

Mark Bradford has explained how his work is informed by such varied sources as the histories of abstraction, cartography and map-making, community networks, and perhaps most fascinatingly the materials he uses themselves. Deftly described by Christopher Bedford, “His rejection of the traditional methods of painting issues not from an objection to the formal characteristics of those materials but from a rejection of those materials as diametrically at odds with the vital social dialectic he maintains between his chosen subjects and the materials he elects to use. To accept Bradford’s practice as a painting practice requires that we expand our materially determined understanding of the discipline…As Bradford notes, “the most important imperative to be questioned is the one that tells you to go to the art supply store to be a painter.” (Exh. Cat., Columbus, The Ohio State University, Wexner Center for the Arts and travelling, Mark Bradford, 2010-12, p. 19) The snippets of textual information, the implication of lettering and photomechanical images that occasionally peep through the heavily built-up surfaces of Potable Water act as a type of narrative, though certainly not as a preordained or planned story, and also suggest a certain autobiography related to the artist's processes of selection and revelation.
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