L13408

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Lot 202
  • 202

Coole, Benjamin.

Estimate
2,000 - 3,000 GBP
Sold
bidding is closed

Description

  • Manuscript memoir, mostly recording his life as a leading member of the Quaker community in Bristol
  • ink on paper
including transcriptions of correspondence with such figures as Wlliam Penn, John Whiting, John Grattan, Stephen Crisp, James Park, George Whitehead, Thomas Camm and Thomas Chalkley, noting events within the community such as an appeal to buy land in Pennsylvania ("...the Country ... being in a prosperous and Thriving Condition...") and a eulogy on the preacher Ann Camm, chronicling local disputes, the history of the wider Quaker community, Coole's involvement in religious controversies in print as well as "paper Combat" by letter, also detailing personal affairs including his involvement in the foundation of the Baptist Mills Brass Works in Bristol in 1702, and national affairs such as the death of William III and the Great Storm of 1703, followed by transcriptions of three tracts by Coole ( "A Letter to a Friend upon the Subject of Printing a Collection of Dying Sayings", "The Case truely stated ... by way of conference between Samuel a Sattisfy'd Friend and Daniel a Dissatisfy'd Friend", and  "A Dissertation" on 2 Corinthians 1:17-20), concluding with a testimonial on Coole from a Men's meeting on 26 March 1718; a fair copy in a single neat and attractive hand,  altogether 321 pages (including a gathering of 16 leaves on smaller paper evidently added to the manuscript at a late stage), folio, c.1718, in contemporary blue morocco gilt with patterned endpapers, with, loosely inserted, "A Letter to a young Lady on her Marriage", binding worn

Provenance

(?) Coole's widow, Abigail Vigor; William Fox, her great-nephew, armorial bookplate; thence by family descent

Catalogue Note

A detailed, personal, and apparently unpublished history of the Quaker community in the late 17th and early 18th century by Benjamin Coole (1664-1717), who was originally from Devizes but settled in Bristol in 1689 and made a fortune as a merchant. 
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