3
3
Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)
ORCHID
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 1,960,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
3
Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)
ORCHID
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 1,960,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings By Chang Dai-Chien ── A Master’s Secrets Unveiled

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Hong Kong

Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)
ORCHID
with one seal of the artist, and two collectorfs seals, one on the titleslip. Titleslip by Kao Ling-mei

Inscription:
Orchid is the most important species among the herbaceous family, followed by daylily and cattail. I have never understood the key to their painting. All I can grasp is a rough idea. Yuan.
ink and colour on paper, hanging scroll
34 BY 58 CM. 13 3/8 BY 22 7/8 IN.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Exhibited

Singapore, Victoria Memorial Hall, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 12-17 March 1963
Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Dewan Bahasa Dan Pustaka, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Daichien, 24-30 June 1963
Malaya, Ipoh, Ku Kong Chow Kung Wai, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 9-16 November 1963
Hong Kong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 17 April-23 May 1993
Japan, Tokyo, Shoto Museum of Art, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 5 April-21 May 1995
Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 28 February-27 April 1997

Literature

Chinese Paintings with the Original Paintings & Discourses on Chinese Art By Professor Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Ling-mei, East Art Co., Hong Kong, February 1961, p. 15
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, March 1963, Singapore exhibit no. 57
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, June 1963, Kuala Lumpur exhibit no. 57
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, November 1963, Ipoh exhibit no. 57
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Mayching, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 1993, pl. 62
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, Shoto Museum of Art, Japan, 1995, pl. 61

Catalogue Note

On Painting Orchids

The Chinese orchid breathes a subtle fragrance, so ethereal yet pervasive that it may steal into one's sleeves almost unnoticed. Though growing in the depth of a virgin forest or a hidden vale, unseen and unappreciated by man, it is content, nevertheless, and its sweetness untempered with sourness. That is why it has come to be called "the recluse orchid". The species that has only one flower on each stalk is known as lan, that which bears several is known as hui.

Of orchid painting, the concept of ethereality should be the central
theme. If the artist can attain this conceptual state, his scroll will
naturally savour of the quiet aroma of his subject.

The most difficult part of orchid painting is the execution of the long
leaf-strokes. The first two or three blades are quite easy to manage but when they grow into a tuft, the difficulty becomes enormous indeed, and the slightest negligence may turn the whole picture into that of weeds and rushes.

In point of composition, the artist should treat one flower as the
principal and support it with three or more blades. No orchid picture
is worth the paper it is painted on, unless every leaf shows the gracefulness of being "in the wind," so to speak. If the artist intends to do a thick tuft of orchids, it is advisable to paint the multiflorous hui, instead of the single-crested lan. As it is a ticklish problem to arrange so many blades into an interesting composition, he must pay the utmost attention to the flowers and charm them  ill they are on the point of dancing.

It is ideal to portray the orchid in ink monochrome. If the artist prefers
water-colour, he may paint the blades in bright indigo and the flowers in tender green or sap green. The centre of the flower should be a shade paler and be slightly dabbed with saf-flower red or red ochre. The stalk, if painted in tender green with a dash of red ochre, may appear more sprightly.

When the picture is done, if the artist desires to define the contour of the plant, he may merely draw the centre line of the blades to indicate light and shade, and that will do. In ink monochrome, it is not advisable to trace any outline at all, since the bend and curve of each leaf is denoted by the brush-stroke itself, the moment the artist manipulates his brush. Light colour becomes the flower, deep colour the blades. The artist must not tamper with the petals, nor try to shade them and thereby identify himself with vulgar taste.

Extracted from Chinese Painting with the Original Paintings and
Discourses on Chinese Art by Professor Chang Dai-chien
Edited and compiled by Kao Ling-mei
Translated by Yao Hsin-nung

The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings By Chang Dai-Chien ── A Master’s Secrets Unveiled

|
Hong Kong