Lot 10
  • 10

Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)

Estimate
700,000 - 900,000 HKD
Sold
2,680,000 HKD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Zhang Daqian (Chang Dai-chien, 1899-1983)
  • BIRD ON A CHERRY BRANCH
  • ink and colour on paper, hanging scroll, 1959
  • 35 BY 47 CM. 13¾ BY 18½ IN.
with two seals of the artist, and two collector’s seals, one on the titleslip. Titleslip by Kao Ling-mei

Inscription:
Summer of the jihai year, Dai-chien Jushi Yuan.

Exhibited

Hong Kong, City Hall Art Gallery, Recent Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 21 April-9 May 1962
Singapore, Victoria Memorial Hall, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 12-17 March 1963
Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Dewan Bahasa Dan Pustaka, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 24-30 June 1963
Malaya, Ipoh, Ku Kong Chow Kung Wai, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 9-16 November 1963
Malaya, Penang, Penang Museum, Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 20-29
December 1963
Hong Kong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, The Mei Yun Tang
Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 17 April-23 May 1993
Japan, Tokyo, Shoto Museum of Art, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 5 April-21 May 1995
Singapore, Singapore Art Museum, The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, 28 February-27 April 1997

Literature

Chinese Paintings with the Original Paintings & Discourses on Chinese Art By Professor Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Ling-mei, East Art Co., Hong Kong, February 1961, p. 73
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, March 1963, Singapore exhibit no. 69
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, June 1963, Kuala Lumpur exhibit no. 69
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, November 1963, Ipoh exhibit no. 69
Exhibition of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, exhibition catalogue, East Art Co., Hong Kong, December 1963, Penang exhibit no. 69
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, edited by Kao Mayching, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 1993, pl. 66
The Mei Yun Tang Collection of Paintings by Chang Dai-chien, Shoto Museum of Art,
Japan, 1995, pl. 65

Catalogue Note

Of Birds
The usual order of painting a bird is to do the beak first, next the eyes,
the head, then the general outline of the whole body in sweeping
strokes. The most important point is that the tail and wings must be
drawn by starting the brush-stroke from the tips; otherwise, the heavy
ink-tone at the outset would not blend with that of the feathers on
the back. By reversing the stroke, the ink-tone will gradually become
lighter, as the brush-stroke sweeps to its end, and the merging will be
practically undetectable. Finally, as to the bird’s feet, they should look
steady on the level ground and their grip firm while on a branch.

In such detail, the superb technique of the Sung masters is
unmatchable. Emperor Hui Tsung, in particular, excels in finesse. He
dots the irises of birds with raw lacquer which, after drying up, becomes
slightly embossed, thus enhancing the liveliness of the eyes.

Extracted from Chinese Painting with the Original Paintings and
Discourses on Chinese Art by Professor Chang Dai-chien
Edited and compiled by Kao Ling-mei
Translated by Yao Hsin-nung

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