Lot 252
  • 252

Rolando Ventura

Estimate
45,000 - 65,000 HKD
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Description

  • Rolando Ventura
  • The Pac-man Pacquiao
  • Signed and dated 2012 on the second panel

  • Acrylic on canvas, in 2 parts
  • EACH: 152.5 by 122 cm.; 60 by 48 in. (2)
  • OVERALL: 152.5 by 244 cm.; 60 by 95 3/4 in.

Condition

This painting is in good condition overall, as is the canvas, which is clear and taut with wooden back support. There are indications of light wear and handling, mainly on the corners and along the edges of the piece. Paint layers are intact. Examination under ultraviolet light shows no evidence of retouching. The color of the actual painting is a warmer yellow tone and not as neon as illustrated in the catalogue. The contrast between shadow and light is more detailed, apparent, and dramatic in reality. Unframed.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Olan Ventura is obsessed with the iconic — from Jesus to Andy Warhol, from Albert Einstein to the despairing Pagliacci-like clown — and with recasting icons in a different light, literally. Ventura refuses to think portraiture has hit a dead end. He chooses to dig elsewhere: not just beneath the skin or under the surface, but by reversing the natural order of colors and going toward the negative image.

The artist's take on the world's first eight-division boxing champ and the reigning pound-for-pound king Manny "The Pac-man" Pacquiao is rife with symbolism. Here is the Philippines' most famous athlete rendered in sober monochrome and with a stony, kingly demeanor, but there is also the Pac-man cast in a negative light, stripped of all the motley-colored pageantry and glitzy showbiz sheen, showing that art — and technology, for that matter — can dig even into the armor of a boxing god to his show inner lights and interior shadows.