Lot 247
  • 247

Rudi Mantofani

Estimate
275,000 - 350,000 HKD
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Description

  • Rudi Mantofani
  • Di Awang-Awang (Up in the Air)
  • Acrylic on canvas
  • 170 by 100 by 14 cm.; 67 by 39 1/4 by 5 1/2 in.
  • Executed circa 2002.

Condition

This work is in good condition overall. There is evidence of minor wear and handling, along with the associated abrasions and minute dots of paint loss along the corners, edges and margins. Under ultraviolet light, there was no indication of restoration. The three-dimensional quality of this work is not entirely apparent in the catalogue illustration, but the actual work features a protrusion of the houses, as well as the metal ladder, on both sides (front and reverse) which is intriguing.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

"The rationale of painting contains the concept of a rectangular area, the characteristics and values of which are defined by having a surface ‚Äč‚Äčthat clings to a wall. Rudi, who never ceases to be intrigued by the notion, challenges this 'ideology' by taking the painting forward a few centimeters away from the wall.

He presents three-dimensional objects that hang in the middle of, or goes through, the surface of a canvas, creating a painting that can be seen from two sides as a real space. Thus it no longer leans its existence against the wall...

...painting is no more than a four-sided object that responds to a wall, the background that thus far has given it its life and existence. If a painting changes neither its form nor purpose nor function , but moves either towards or away from the wall, could we insist that the 'painting' is still a painting?"

HENDRO WIYANTO CITED IN CAKRAWALA GANDA, NADI GALLERY, March 18-29, 2002, EXH. CAT., P. 3-4., (TRANSLATED)