Lot 211
  • 211

Winner Jumalon

Estimate
50,000 - 70,000 HKD
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Description

  • Winner Jumalon
  • Trading Places
  • Signed and dated 2012
  • Oil on canvas
  • 183 by 241 cm.; 72 by 95 in.

Condition

The work is in good condition overall, as is the canvas. There is minor wear and handling to the edges, but the paint layers are well-preserved and stable. Under ultraviolet light inspection there is no evidence of restoration. Unframed, on stretcher.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

Depth comes in various layers in Trading Places, each perspective canceling the orientation of another.  Midframe is placed a house, set against a local wharf.  Hazy mountains and a docked ship are seen in the horizon, orienting the viewer where the depth should flow towards. But the house is stubborn. Comprised of images, outlined in lighter colors against the general somber mood of the locale—the house beckons the direction of gaze towards it. Under its duress, the wharf is flat and the horizon just a line. The land beyond lies within the home. This is where the voyage leads.

Winner digs deep into the case of identity, going beyond his usual portraits, in search of real. Trading Places visualizes the dilemma—this is a representation of his house in the province. Fragments of living in the rural—photographed, then painted, then installed to form a semblance of a home, and then painted again against an alien setting. The channel towards memory is deep and confusing, its process a meticulous search for points of detachment. Each layer points to a pain brought by disengagement. Real is relative as home is a haze—the repetition of layers of representation somehow pointing to a sad toughening of the delicate in the face of such constant revolutions. 

Winner's affectations pertain to that lost rural space—a pastoral  place and time of innocence (and within this limitation, a certain sense of reality)—slowly crawling its way to the bustling urban. As part of a continuing series of the same home put against different spaces, Trading Places traces the tragic circle of modern development that forms and breaks spaces as the need to survive and comply with system intensifies—from the rural breaking up to connect to the Polis, to the Polis now slowly conglomerating into a Megalopolis allegedly brought by the so-called erasing of borders to accommodate the other.

Such a density cannot hold, and here Winner gently paints his rural sensibilities in the form of nostalgia. Jumalon trades places for placelessness, carefully rendering his images of severance with a patina of sobriety. He chooses to focus on the small and manageable, such as this familiar place. As it seems to be the only way to survive the flux, he forcefully flattens other spaces to accommodate intimacies.

- Adjani Arumpac