89
89
Sonia Khurana
LONE WOMEN DON'T LIE
Estimate
9,00011,000
JUMP TO LOT
89
Sonia Khurana
LONE WOMEN DON'T LIE
Estimate
9,00011,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art including Indian Miniature Paintings

|
London

Sonia Khurana
B. 1968
LONE WOMEN DON'T LIE

1999/2000

Edition 3 of 10


Single channel video for monitor
black and white / silent / 4 minutes looped DVD PAL
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Exhibited

New Delhi, India Art Fair, January 2012

Paris, Paris-Delhi-Bombay, Centre Pompidou, May - September 2011

Milan, New Delhi New Wave, Gallery Marella, 2007

New York, New York Art Fair, 2007

New Delhi, lone women don't lie, 2000

Calcutta, lone women don't lie, 2000

 

Catalogue Note

Sonia Khurana's art practice embraces areas in-between video, photography, elements of performance, text drawing, installation, and more recently, works in public spaces. She tends to draw critically on concerns with interiority and the poetics of everyday experiences in ways that are often visually simple and understated. Through these poetic intimations she aims to persistently explore and re-define the space of the political.

'lone women don't lie is a sequel to the video bird and the first in the series of visual dialogues; with myself, with other people, or even with cities, that I often use as devices order to foreground desire, intimacy, vulnerability, power and so on, it its every-day manifestations. Filmed in my studio in London in 1999 lone women don't lie attempts to foreground the erotic dimension of the desiring self; over-powering oneself through a playful display of exaggerated affection.' (Sonia Khurana 2000)

'In lone women don't lie ... dual appearances of the head and naked shoulders of the artist herself against a white backdrop perform a mutual adoration. Nibbling 'herself', the sometimes erotic, sometimes childlike bobbing face of the artist engages in a nuzzling, sniffing, pecking apprehension of an original image or object that lies off screen. The focus of that apprehension, turned back on itself, now gently gnashes her teeth, now rapidly laps and flicks her tongue. The whole asymmetrical sequence ends with a sudden meeting of lips in a frozen, fleshy kiss.
 This is an amusing performance... yet its perceptual significance lies in the fact that the sharing of a perceptual field and represented space... presents both a distinct simultaneity - two women playing in almost identical ways - and discontinuity, with performances happening at staggered times.' (Excerpts from: Wainwright, Dr. L, 'A Phenomenology of Origins', lone women don't lie, London 2000)

Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art including Indian Miniature Paintings

|
London