Lot 177
  • 177

An important and very fine North Italian Neoclassical two-tone gilded firescreen, attributed to Giuseppe Bonzanigo Piedmontese, circa 1780

Estimate
25,000 - 35,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • oak, pleaxiglass, silk, coral
  • height 65 1/4 in.; width 36 1/4 in.
  • 166 cm; 92.5 cm

Provenance

Bernard Steinitz, Paris

Literature

 

Condition

Upholstered with embroidered silk with the ground worked in polychrome silk and metal thread within metal galloon trim, probably French or Italian and possibly from a chasuble, circa 1700. With scattered age and construction cracks, dents and abrasions. One leg and stretcher with restored breaks. Carving and gessoed elements with some losses, chips and restored breaks. Applied gesso decoration with scattered losses. Gesso with fine cracks, small losses and abrasions. Regilt, gilding with some rubbing, abrasions and losses. With minor old worm damage; not extensive. Now with pleaxiglass to protect emnboidered inset. In good condition.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

The firescreen can be attributed to Bonzanigo based upon the sculpture of the garlands of flowers and leaves, and in particular, the use of the double gilding and including elements such as the quiver and the torch that are found also on the celebrated firescreen in the Palazzo Reale in Turin, traditionally attributed to Bonzanigo, see Roberto Antonetto, Il Mobile Piemontese Nel Settecento, Turin, 2011, p. 358, pl. 532. Compare as well the scroll of leaves found on the famous armchair by Bonzanigo carved for the Principessa di Piedmonte in the Royal Palace, Turin. The work of Giuseppe Maria Bonzanigo is regarded as among the best neoclassical furniture ever sculpted. Of Piedmontese origin, he settled in Turin in 1773, where he worked as a sculptor, wood carver and cabinet-maker for the royal family.