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Details & Cataloguing

Important English and European Furniture, Silver, Porcelain and Carpets

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A fine George III satinwood, harewood and fruitwood marquetry commode

of D-shaped form, the escalettes marble top with a gilt-metal gadrooned edge above a conforming frieze inlaid with anthemion and sprays of leaves joined by scrolls and with a drawer at the center, above two large drawers inlaid with swags of drapery joined by flowerheads, flanked by pilasters headed by inlaid flowerhead paterae above upright and pendant-berried leaves further flanked by pilasters headed by oval flowerhead paterae above pendant-berried leaves joined by a patera, and continuing to line-panelled tapered legs with spade toes, the bowed ends crossbanded and inlaid at the center with oval harewood panels finely inlaid with neo-classical covered urns, enclosing shelves, curved ends, each side with a similarly inlaid frieze above a crossbanded door with an oval harewood panel inlaid with a neo-classical urn with fluted sides above a gadrooned socle, the handles formed as foliate scrolls supporting drapery, the base with a gilt-metal guilloche-pattern mount, and supported on square-tapered crossbanded feet with spade toes.  Later marble top and gilt-metal mounts.


height 32 1/4 in.; width 4 ft. 4 in.; depth 23 in.
81.9 cm; 132.1 cm; 58.4 cm
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Provenance

C. H. F. Kindermann, Esq.

Exhibited

The Antique Dealers' Fair and Exhibition, Grosvenor House, June 9-24 1965, p. 41, R. L. Harrington Ltd., London, stand 18

Literature

Herbert Cescinsky, English Furniture of the 18th Century, London, 1911, p. 304, fig. 332

Catalogue Note

This important satinwood commode is notable for the fine quality of its neo-classical marquetry inlay on satinwood and harewood grounds; in particular the oval panels on the doors illustrate the artistry and technique of the finest marqueteurs of this period, the source of the design of the draped urns, this 'antique' motif being derived from engravings. This was a specialist art, the inlayer not necessarily being employed in a single workshop. In particular a group of Swedish are recorded as exhibiting individual examples of their work at the Free Society of Artists in the 1770s. These included Carl Gustave Martin who first exhibited in 1771, Christopher Furlough who showed 'A Baccante inlay' in 1773 and 'A Venus attired by Graces' in 1774. In 1774 Johan Linning, who described himself as an 'Inlayer at Mr. Furlogh's, 24 Tottenham Court Rd', exhibited 'The Muse Erato'.

Important English and European Furniture, Silver, Porcelain and Carpets

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New York