267
267

PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

A fine George III sycamore, harewood and mahogany marquetry pier table attributed to John Linnell
circa 1780
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
267

PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

A fine George III sycamore, harewood and mahogany marquetry pier table attributed to John Linnell
circa 1780
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important English and European Furniture, Silver, Porcelain and Carpets

|
New York

A fine George III sycamore, harewood and mahogany marquetry pier table attributed to John Linnell
circa 1780

The D-shaped top with trellis and stylized leaf quatrefoil marquetry within a crossbanded border and gilt-metal leaf-cast edge above a frieze with marquetry roundels and simulated fluting above a gilt-metal entrelac border, raised on tapering square legs inlaid with an entwined vine, headed by satinwood panels and ending in casters.  The back with chalked number B1704Gilt-metal mounts later, lacking some mounts, restorations to marquetry, casters later.


height 32 1/2 in.; width 47 3/4 in.; depth 18 1/2 in.
82.6 cm; 121.3 cm; 47 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sold, Sotheby's, London, July 11, 1986, lot 79

Sold, Christie's, New York, October 14, 1989, lot 138

Gerald Bland, New York

Catalogue Note

The present table formerly almost identical to a pair of pier tables at Heveningham Hall, Suffolk, (Hayward and Kirkam, op. cit. p. 162, fig. 309 and 310) which is based on their very close resemblance to another pair of pier tables made by John Linnell for the 5th Duke of Argyll at Inverary Castle in 1779/1780.  Linnell is recorded as working for Argyle at Inverary castle from 1773 till 1781 supplying him three marquetry tables as well as six giltwood armchairs and two confidantes.  The design of the present tables was perhaps the most advanced of its time, making use of very French style lattice marquetry to the top, similar to the lattice marquetry on a commode by Fuhrolhg, now in the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Liverpool. (Wood, 1994, op. cit. p. 107, no. 9)

The émigré Swedish cabinet maker Christopher Fuhrlohg, born in Stockholm around 1740, came from a Swiss family which had earlier emigrated to Sweden. As a young man he travelled to Amsterdam and later Paris where he received his earlier training probably serving his apprenticeship in the workshop of the leading ébéniste, Simon Oeben. In 1766 or 1767, he arrived in England where he was joined by his future brother-in-law George Haupt, who had previously accompanied him to Amsterdam and Paris and who was himself a distinguished cabinet maker. Both of these men were perhaps introduced to Linnell by Sir William Chambers, who had been born in Sweden of a Scottish family and was an ally to Swedish artists and craftsmen in England. (Cator, op. cit., p 77) Both men are thought to have found employment in the workshop of John Linnell. Fuhrlohg became well known for his skill in making Neo-classical marquetry panels and regularly participated in the annual exhibitions of the Free Society of Artists of Great Britain where in 1773 he presented a 'bacchante in inlay', and in 1774 a 'Venus attired by the Graces in inlay', together with a 'Flora in inlay'.

See:

Charles Cator, 'Haupt at Petworth', Furniture History, Leeds, 1993, vol. XXIX

Helena Hayward and Pat Kirkham, William and John Linnell, New York, 1980

Lucy Wood, 'A Bonheur-du-jour at Stourhead', Furniture History, Leeds, 2007, vol. XLIII

Lucy Wood, The Lady Lever Art Gallery Catalogue of Commodes, London, 1994

Important English and European Furniture, Silver, Porcelain and Carpets

|
New York