627
627
Rare Needlework Sampler, Sarah Groff, probably Philadelphia, circa 1796
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
627
Rare Needlework Sampler, Sarah Groff, probably Philadelphia, circa 1796
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important American Schoolgirl Embroideries: The Landmark Collection of Betty Ring

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New York

Rare Needlework Sampler, Sarah Groff, probably Philadelphia, circa 1796
Worked in silk on linen; inscribed Sarah Groff, the Daughter of John and Deborah Groff, was born the 17th Day of March, 1785.
Height 15 3/4 in. by width 12 1/4 in.
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Provenance

Malcolm Stearns, Jr. Hobart House, Haddam, Connecticut, April 12, 1976.

Exhibited

American Needlework Treasures: Samplers and Silk Embroideries from the Collection of Betty Ring at the Museum of American Folk Art (p. 37, fig. 60)

Catalogue Note

With their narrow borders and tight lettering, this sampler bears kinship to earlier Philadelphia work, and probably Sarah attended school there. Her sister Lettisha worked an almost identical sampler in 1797 (Octagon House, San Francisco) and a closely related piece in 1798 (Philadelphia Museum of Art). Her sister Deborah's 1807 sampler is described in Bolton and Coe, American Samplers, p. 166. Sarah Groff (1785- 1826), the daughter of John Groff (c. 1749-1826), and Deborah, lived in Woolwich, Gloucester County, New Jersey. She became a member of the Friends at the Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting in February 1802 (although her parents were not Quakers), and on April 23, 1803 she was married there to Thomas Ivins. Her grave is in the Woodstown Friends' Cemetery (Salem County), with her father in the adjoining yard for non-members.

Sarah Groff was one of eight children.  Sarah and Thomas Ivins (1777-1835) had one daughter and four sons. (Additional information provided by Carol and Stephen Huber).

Important American Schoolgirl Embroideries: The Landmark Collection of Betty Ring

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New York