247
247
Purcell, Henry (1659-1695).
THE SONGS IN THE INDIAN QUEEN: AS IT IS NOW COMPOS'D INTO AN OPERA. LONDON: J. HEPTINSTALL FOR JOHN DAY AND JOHN HUDGEBUTT, 1695.
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 9,375 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
247
Purcell, Henry (1659-1695).
THE SONGS IN THE INDIAN QUEEN: AS IT IS NOW COMPOS'D INTO AN OPERA. LONDON: J. HEPTINSTALL FOR JOHN DAY AND JOHN HUDGEBUTT, 1695.
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 9,375 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Collection Meyer

|
Paris

Purcell, Henry (1659-1695).
THE SONGS IN THE INDIAN QUEEN: AS IT IS NOW COMPOS'D INTO AN OPERA. LONDON: J. HEPTINSTALL FOR JOHN DAY AND JOHN HUDGEBUTT, 1695.
première édition, in-folio (32 x 20 cm), [2] et 14 pages, petite gravure sur bois à la page de titre, lettre de l'éditeur au compositeur, musique imprimée, demi-veau du XXe siècle, pagination manuscrite de l'époque, restaurations aux marges, coins restaurés aux premières et dernières pages, uniformement brunies.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Ex-libris de Godfrey E.P. Arkwright.

Literature

Day & Murrie, English Song Books 1651-1701, no.137 RISM P5887 ; BUC, p.862 ; Wing D2367 ; Robert Thompson, The Glory of the Temple and the Stage. Henry Purcell (1659-1695), 1995, p.41 ; Zimmerman 630 (p.492: 1695m).

Catalogue Note

Très rare: Nous n'avons pas retrouvé de trace de la première édition de l'Indian Queen de Purcell depuis plus de cinquante ans. Le dernier exemple que nous avons retrouvé fut vendu dans nos salles à Londres le 24 Mai 1954, lot 131, qui pourrait être ce présent exemplaire.

"The Indian Queen is Purcell's greatest late theatre work" (The New Grove vol.20, p.614), malgré le fait que l'oeuvre fut laissée inachevée à sa mort. Le dernier act fut composé par le plus jeune frère du compositeur, Daniel, mais cette musique n'est pas présente dans cette édition. Les paroles sont principalement du grand dramaturge John Dryen. Comme la plupart des oeuvres de théatre tardives de Purcell, sa version manuscrite est perdue et la principale source manuscrite, British Library Add. ms.31449, est "fortement inexacte malgré le fait que le copiste fut un assistant de longue date de Purcell" (Thompson, p.41). Aucune édition plus complète ne fut publiée jusqu'à 1790.

La présente partition contient une des plus célèbres chansons de Purcell, 'I attempt from Love's sickness to fly' dans l'acte 3, avec 'Wake, Quivera wake, our soft rest must cease', 'Why should men quarrel here?', 'Their looks are such that Mercy flows from thence', 'Scorn'd Envy here's nothing that thou canst blast', 'Begone, curst Feinds of Hell', 'Ah! ah! how happy are we!' et 'They tell us that you mighty Powers above'.

Les Songs furent publiées à l'innitiative de May et Hudgebutt, qui écrive dans leur lettre à Purcell qu'ils ont "found a Jewel of very great Value; on which account we were unwilling that so rich a Treasure should any longer lie bury'd in Oblivion", malgré le fait que "we well knew your innate Modesty to be such, as not to be easily prevail'd upon to set forth any thing in Print", et que "were so much the more emboldened to make this Attempt even without acquainting you with our design..".


Very rare
: We have no record of the first edition of Purcell's Indian Queen at auction for over fifty years.  The last example we have traced was that sold in our London rooms on 24 May 1954, lot 131, which may indeed be the same copy as this.  

"The Indian Queen is Purcell's greatest late theatre work" (The New Grovevol.20, p.614), despite being left unfnished at his death.  The last act masque was composed by Henry's younger brother Daniel, but that music is not included in the Songs published here.   The words are principlally by the great Restoration dramatist John Dryden.  As with most of Purcell's late theatrical works, his autograph is lost and the principal manuscript source, British Library Add. ms.31449, is "highly inaccurate although the music copyist was a long-standing assistant of Purcell" (Thompson, p.41).  A more complete edition was not published until 1790.

The present score contains one of Purcell's most celebrated songs, 'I attempt from Love's sickness to fly' from Act 3, together with 'Wake, Quivera, wake, our soft rest must cease", 'Why should men quarrel here?', 'Their looks are such that Mercy flows from thence', 'Scorn'd Envy here's nothing that thou canst blast', 'Begone, curst Feinds of Hell', 'Ah! ah! how happy are we!' and 'They tell us that you mighty Powers above'.

The Songs were published on the initiative of May and Hudgebutt themselves, who state in their letter to Purcell that they had "found a Jewel of very great Value; on which account we were unwilling that so rich a Treasure should any longer lie bury'd in Oblivion", despite the fact that "we well knew your innate Modesty to be such, as not to be easily prevail'd upon to set forth any thing in Print", and "were so much the more emboldened to make this Attempt even without acquainting you with our design..".

Collection Meyer

|
Paris