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A matched set of eight George III mahogany `cockpen' armchairs
late 18th/early19th century
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57
A matched set of eight George III mahogany `cockpen' armchairs
late 18th/early19th century
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A matched set of eight George III mahogany `cockpen' armchairs
late 18th/early19th century
comprising a set of six armchairs, three stamped CW, one stamped AM, and a further pair of armchairs, one stamped WC
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Provenance

By family repute, Archibald Kennedy, 1st Marquess of Ailsa ( 1770-1846), Culzean Castle, Ayrshire. Subsequently passing by descent,  to his son Lord Gilbert Kennedy ( 1822-1901), then to this daughter Mary Kennedy,  ( married Alfred John Howard, Worton Hall, Isleworth,1876,  d.1916), then her daughter the Hon. Mrs Claud Biddulph (1880-1970), then to her daughter Lady Marjory Findlay (1915-1995) and then to the present vendor. 

Catalogue Note

The origin of the characteristically Scottish `cockpen' chair has led to various suggestions. The most widely accepted of these relates to the village of Cockpen in Midlothian, part of the Dalhousie estate. The family pew of the Earls and Marquesses of Dalhousie in Cockpen church used to contain examples of this form of chair. A derivation of the `Chinese Chippendale' style, the cockpen chair thrived in Scotland during the second half of the 18th century, however, the term appears never to have been used during this period, either in accounts or inventories ( cf. Sebastian Pryke, `Cockpen Quest', Country Life, 29 April 1993, pp.80-81).

A very similar chair possibly by the Scottish firm of Young, Hamilton and Trotter is illustrated in F. Bamford, A Dictionary of Edinburgh Wrights and Furniture Makers 1660-1840, 1983, pl.46.

For comparison, see Sotheby`s London, Important English Furniture, 7th July 2000, lot 94, a set of six chairs sold for £35,000. 

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