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Milking Scene, A Flemish `Teniers' tapestry, after David Teniers the Younger, Brussels, workshop of Jasper Van Der Borcht (signed himself `A Castro') and Jeroen Le Clerc,
late 17th Century, 
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Milking Scene, A Flemish `Teniers' tapestry, after David Teniers the Younger, Brussels, workshop of Jasper Van Der Borcht (signed himself `A Castro') and Jeroen Le Clerc,
late 17th Century, 
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Details & Cataloguing

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Milking Scene, A Flemish `Teniers' tapestry, after David Teniers the Younger, Brussels, workshop of Jasper Van Der Borcht (signed himself `A Castro') and Jeroen Le Clerc,
late 17th Century, 

woven in wool and silk, within a four sided acanthus and floral border with mask clasp corners, the top border centred with coat of arms of Filippo Archinto of Milan (1644-1712) and woven motto Lavs et Lavrvs Archintaea, woven with D.Teniers F within the tapestry, the border selvedge with the weaver and IVD Borcht, A Castro, and the Brussels Brabant town mark


Approximately 406cm. high, 468cm. wide; 13ft. 4in., 15ft. 4in.
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Provenance

Commissioned for Filippo Archinto of Milan (1644—1712), who in 1688 married Camilla, daughter of Marchese, Girolamo Stampa and Anna Visconti.
Complete set of eight recorded on the market in 1861, wholly or in part having formerly belonged initially to Lord Overstone (d.1883), and then to his daughter and heir, Lady Wantage.
(The other half of the set formerly belonging to the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres, was sold at Christie's, 14th March 1929, and in 1932, was recorded in the possession of Messrs. P. W. French and Co., New York).
Present four tapestries were purchased from Duveen (Antique Dealers) in 1884, by Edward Cecil Guinness, 1st Earl of Iveagh (memorandum book kept by the 1st Earl of Iveagh, notes this date and purchase from the dealers as `including six pieces after Teniers').
Thence by descent, Farmleigh, Dublin, Ireland.

Catalogue Note

Literature

Delmarcel, Guy, Flemish Tapestries, London, 1999, pp.352-361, for a comprehensive discussion of the `Teniers' Tapestries.
Heffernan, Mary and Cummins, Julia, Iveagh Pictures, Edward Cecil Guiness, 1st Earl of Iveagh, Exhibition Catalogue, 5th November – 23rd December 2009, Dublin, 2009, pp.92-93, Cat. 27. Four Brussels Tapestries, details of each tapestry, and general photograph hanging in situ.
Kelly, Catherine and McCarthy, Patricia, Farmleigh, Dublin, 2001, pg.36.
H. C. Marillier, Handbook to the Teniers Tapestries, London, 1932, pp.3-10, illustration of Iveagh tapestries, Kermesse, pl. 1, Gipsy Fortune Teller, pl.22, comparable tapestry panels for the series include Return from the Harvest, pl.16a, and Milking Scene, pl.18a, both without borders.

Generally known as `Teniers' Tapestries, the extensive series were inspired by the paintings of David II Teniers (1610-1690) and depict everyday scenes of country life and commercial activities. They were immensely popular commissions from the late seventeenth century through to the middle of the eighteenth century. The `Teniers' tapestries were woven by many Brussels weavers and also in other centres such as Lille, Oudenaarde, Beauvais and Madrid. 

Importantly, Jasper (or Gaspard) van der Borcht and Jeroen le Clerc collaborated in the production of the `Teniers' inspired series of tapestries which are amongst the first woven.  They worked under the patronage of the Elector Maximilian Emmanuel of Bavaria and other German and Austrian Princes. Teniers tapestries were woven by van der Borcht and Le Clerc workshop, with one of the other's name woven in them, for the ex-Crown Prince of Bavaria, Crown Prince Rupprecht (with borders, woven circa 1693, now in the `Wittelsbacher Ausgleichfonds', Munich) and the Grand Duke of Baden. Others of the same workshop origin with variation in design are recorded from the collections of The Cathedral at Santiago, the Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, Elveden, Wolterton and other English country houses.

This tapestry together with the three proceeding lots, was initially a set of eight which included the scenes of the Kermesse, Return from Harvest, Milking Scene, Gipsy Fortune Telling, Fish Quay, Winter Scene (Skating and Pig-Killing), Sportsmen Resting and Summer (Pastoral Scene), and were woven within a four-sided border with exuberant scrolling acanthus leaves and the top border centred with the coat-of-arms of Filippo Archinto of Milan, with the woven motto Lavs et Lavrvs Archintaea ('Praise and Glory to Archinto')

Filippo Archinto (b. Milan, 1644), studied law and received various honours during this lifetime. In 1688 he married, Camilla, the only daughter of Marchese Girolamo Stampa and Anna Visconti, enriching his already substantial legacy of land, funds, houses, and art collections. In 1677 Charles II of Spain sent him as ambassador to the Electors of the Empire, to Brussels as a member of the political-military government in charge of the Spanish Netherlands, and in 1678 he was sent as ambassador to the Emperor Leopold in Vienna. Then in 1681 he returned briefly to Flanders before travelling back to live in various Italian cities until his death in 1712 in Pavia, on which he left his property to his son and heir Charles. Archinto was amongst many aristocrats and royals who commissioned tapestries when based in the Spanish Netherlands. The present tapestry bears the coat of arms of Archinto and his wife (Stampa and Visconti), therefore dating it to after 1688.

To show the dedication to David II Teniers, court painter to the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm, the following inscription was incorporated into some of their tapestry designs, Teniers.Seriess.II.Leopoldo.Archidvci Ioanni Avstriaco Pictor Famliais et Vtriq.Acvbicvlis Pinx.

Variants of the Latin inscription are found on examples of the tapestries from the workshop of Jasper van der Borcht and Jeroen le Clerc, but not on later weavings. For examples from the first cartoons and from this specific commission, the tapestry of the `Fish Quay, includes the same Latin inscription as the offered tapestry of the Kermesse, see Marillier, Handbook to the Teniers Tapestries, London, 1932, pl.8, from the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres, and another example of the subject, without an armorial coat-of-arms, which was offered at Sotheby's London, 20th May 1994, lot 5.

For a comparable early weaving of this composition of `Milking Scene', without borders, from the series woven for Prince Rupprecht, see Marillier, opcit. pl. 18a.

The Earl of Crawford and Balcarres is recorded as having had the remaining tapestries from the Archinto series, depicting The Fish Quay, Winter Scene (Skating and Pig-Killing), Sportsmen Resting and Summer (Pastoral Scene), all of which are illustrated in Marillier, ibid. pl.8, 20, 25 & 39a. Six are recorded in the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Dresden, which include the same Latin inscription in the masonry depicted in the Fish Quay.  

The van der Borcht family were important Brussels weavers active from the late 17th century through to late 18th century.  Jasper Van Der Borcht (I.V.D. Borcht, A Castro) was privileged in 1684, d. 1742. He signed himself `A Castro' to distinguish himself from his father, Jacob. Between 1703 and 1707, Jasper is recorded as having had five looms in operation. Jasper's son Jan-Frans van der Borght (F.V.D.Borght) d. 1774, continued the workshop with his brother Peter until his death in 1763, they wove the Teniers subjects derived after the cartoons by their father and his colleague Jeroen Le Clerc (d.1722).  Judocus de Vos (1661-1734) is thought to have obtained the Teniers cartoons from Jacob van der Borcht and Le Clerc and reproduced and altered them in various weavings. From the initial cartoons, other subjects were added over time.

Jeroen Le Clerc (d. 1722) and Jasper van der Borght (d. 1742), are known to have collaborated on several large series, most notably including the The Siege of Tunis and The Arts of War Series, designed by Lambert de Hondt, and woven in seven sets including those for The Elector Maximilian-Emmanuel of Bavaria (d. 1726), the Margrave Louis of Baden, King William III of England, and the Duke of Marlborough and his generals.

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