L12305

/

Lot 306
  • 306

A Castelli maiolica apothecary jar, circa 1530-1540

Estimate
50,000 - 80,000 GBP
Log in to view results
bidding is closed

Description

  • pottery
  • 38cm, 15in high
of Orsini-Colonna type, the ovoid body with twin strap handles, boldly painted with a large finely-drawn portrait head of a bearded man in informal military dress, against a dark blue-washed ground within blue-ground borders of formal ornament, the neck with a panel inscribed with the drug name in gothic script, the reverse with large-scale sketched floral ornament in blue

Condition

Foot rim restored, one crack above along scroll rim restored. Chips to one handle restored. Otherwise typical chips and flaking.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

The celebrated 'Orsini-Colonna' series of apothecary jars, made by the Pompei family at Castelli over a period of some forty years, includes very few of these substantial two-handled jars, though a similar jar was sold in these rooms, 6th December 2011, lot 5. The fine and meticulous detail of that jar is also more closely similar to that on the present piece than on most other examples of the series.

The identity of the imposing elderly gentleman in the portrait remains enigmatic, though he bears some resemblance to the figure of Cimon in the well-known 'Roman Charity' bottle from the series, formerly in the Sprovieri collection; see T. Wilson, Ceramic Art of the Italian Renaissance, no.189, pp.484-485
Close