60
60
An American two-color gold-mounted California gold quartz "bear" brooch and en suite gold and quartz-mounted cane, probably San Francisco, dated 1889
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
60
An American two-color gold-mounted California gold quartz "bear" brooch and en suite gold and quartz-mounted cane, probably San Francisco, dated 1889
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

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New York

An American two-color gold-mounted California gold quartz "bear" brooch and en suite gold and quartz-mounted cane, probably San Francisco, dated 1889

brooch in rose gold with mosaic of gold-quartz lozenges, capped by yellow gold bear head flanked by patinated gold claws, the back with inscription, the yellow gold cane handle chased with foliage and with gold quartz ovals at angle and terminal, engraved en suite, fitted to a cane


apparently unmarked
length of brooch 3 in., of cane handle 3 5/8 in.
7.5cm, 9.2cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

The brooch is engraved, "Mrs. Rhosena M. Hudson from H.O. Southworth, Stockton, Cal. Feb. 2d 1839 - Feb. 2d 1889."  The cane handle is engraved, "Wm H. Hudson. Feb 2d 1839 Feb. 2d 1889. From H.O. Southworth, Stockton, Cal."

Henry Oswald Southworth (b. 1834) was "of an old pioneer family of California," the son of General Mason D. Southworth.  He served as mayor of Stockton several times and helped found a local hospital for the mentally impaired.  He was one half of the dry goods firm Southworth & Grattan and married into his partner's family but the business failed about 1892.

Southworth's first wife was Charlotte Hudson, presumably a relation of William H. Hudson.  The dates suggest a golden wedding celebration, possibly Southworth's in-laws, but no exact match has been found.

A Rose M. Hudson (but not Rhosena) is recorded in Stockton at this time, but her husband is listed as A.D. Hudson, physician.  Stockton had a population of less than 15,000 in 1890, so pieces of this sophistication were almost certainly ordered in nearby San Francisco.

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

|
New York