120
120
The Ebenezer Mosely Beaker: An American silver beaker, Benjamin Pierpont, Boston, dated 1773
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 8,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT
120
The Ebenezer Mosely Beaker: An American silver beaker, Benjamin Pierpont, Boston, dated 1773
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 8,125 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

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New York

The Ebenezer Mosely Beaker: An American silver beaker, Benjamin Pierpont, Boston, dated 1773
tapered cylindrical, engraved on side in script The Gift of Mr Ebenezer Mosley to the first Church of Christ in DORCHESTER 1773
marked BP in rectangle near rim (Kane mark B)
height 5 1/2 in.
14cm
8oz. 12 dwt
267gr.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Bequest of Ebenezer Mosley in 1769 to

The First Parish in Dorchester, Dorchester, MA

Exhibited

Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1911. American Church Silver of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, with a few pieces of Domestic Plate, no. 829, p. 99
Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, loan, 1938-2011

Literature

Boston (Mass.), City Council, Documents of the City of Boston, 1881, Volume 1, Issues 1-18, p. 40.
Wiliam Blake Trask, Early Matters relating to the town and First church of Dorchester, Mass., 1886, p.11.
E. Alfred Jones, The Old Silver of American Churches, 1913, p. 146.
Patricia E. Kane, Colonial Massachusetts Silversmiths and Jewelers, 1988, p.773

Catalogue Note

Ebenezer Mosley, Jr. was born in Dorchester, MA on 19 May 1695, the first son of Ebenezer Mosley (1673-1740) and his wife Elizabeth Trescott (1668-1705).  Mosley married Elizabeth Atherton (1702-1783) in Dorchester on 29 May 1718. Together they had eight children. Mosley died on 23 March 1773.  His will dated 28 July 1769 records a legacy of five pounds to his church with which the present lot was purchased.  Ebenezer Sr.'s wil dated 8 March 1739-40 (proved 27 September 1740) also bequeathed twenty pounds to his church with which a silver beaker was bought. Both father and son are thought to have been weavers.

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

|
New York