118
118
The Deacon Hopestill Clap Tankard: An American silver tankard, Jacob Hurd, Boston, circa 1748
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
118
The Deacon Hopestill Clap Tankard: An American silver tankard, Jacob Hurd, Boston, circa 1748
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

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New York

The Deacon Hopestill Clap Tankard: An American silver tankard, Jacob Hurd, Boston, circa 1748
tapered cylindrical with molded girdle, engraved with Rogers arms in acanthus and diaper cartouche and in semi-script below mid-band, The Gift of Deacon HOPESTILL CLAP to the Church of Christ in Dorchester 1748 on front
maker's mark HURD in very small rectangle on cover and at left of handle (Kane mark D)
height 7 7/8 in.
20cm
25oz
778g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Bequest of Hopestill Clap in 1748 to
The First Parish in Dorchester, Dorchester, MA

Exhibited

Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1911. American Church Silver of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, with a few pieces of Domestic Plate, no. 660
Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, loan, 1938-2011

Literature

William Blake Trask, Early Matters Relating to the Town and First Church of Dorchester, 1886, p.11.
John Henry Buck, Old Plate, its Makers & Marks, 1903, p. 239.
E. Alfred Jones, The Old Silver of American Churches, 1913, p. 147-48.
Charles Knowles Bolton, Bolton's American Amory, 1927, p. 141.
Hollis French, Jacob Hurd and His Sons Nathaniel & Benjamin, Silversmiths 1702-1781, 1939, p. 45.
Patricia E. Kane, Colonial Massachusetts Silversmiths and Jewelers, 1998, p. 608.

Catalogue Note

Captain Clapp and his wife were seemingly well-educated as both signed their 1680 deed.  Additionally, Captain Clapp penned his own memoirs late in life.  His memoirs, which were published by the Dorchester Antiquarian Historical Society in 1844, provide invaluable insight into 17th century colonial life, including his voyage from England and interactions with the Indians.  Captain Clapp reflects upon his life in the developing colony: "I do not remember that ever I did wish in my heart that I had not come to this country, or wish myself back again to my father's house." 

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets

|
New York