201
201

PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT MIDWEST COLLECTION

Georges Rouault
PIERRETTE
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 446,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
201

PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT MIDWEST COLLECTION

Georges Rouault
PIERRETTE
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 446,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Georges Rouault
1871 - 1958
PIERRETTE

Signed G Rouault (lower right)


Oil on paper mounted on canvas
19 3/8 by 13 1/8 in.
49.2 by 33.3 cm
Painted in 1939.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Ambroise Vollard, Paris (acquired from the artist's family)
O'Hana Gallery, London
Acquired from the above in 1964

Literature

Isabelle Rouault & Bernard Dorival, Rouault, L'Oeuvre peint, vol. II, Monte Carlo, 1988, no. 1958, illustrated p. 166

Catalogue Note

Edward Alden Jewell states the following about the early years of Rouault's artistic production: "Though not 'officially' a Fauve, Rouault showed with the group and became popularly identified with it.  Like that of the Fauves, Rouault's was in those days an art of violent expressionism.  And like theirs it represented a revolt against the stuffy academic standards of the day.  But Rouault also walked apart.  For one thing, he differed from the Fauves in that his art of that period was not decorative.  Instead, it was passionately dedicated, as the art of the Fauves in the main was not, to pregnant social issues" (E.A. Jewell, Rouault, London, 1947, p. 8).

Jewell continues, "From about 1917 onward the principal paint medium is oil.  And when Rouault elects this medium he does so not because it is 'heavier,' but simply because it lends itself to the creation of textures and effects not otherwise to be contrived.  The loaded brush dragged across a specified area can pile up rich plump sonorities, as may be observed in that memorable masterpiece, The Old King, or in The Wounded Clown."

"Often the piling up of paint is done, actually, in layers; for Rouault has long made it a practice to hold on to paintings over a considerable stretch of years, turning back to them repeatedly, brush in hand.  This procedure makes it in many cases difficult or quite impossible to date work, even work that bears a hallmark of one period rather than of another" (ibid., p. 11). 

In the present work, a plethora of layers of pigment can be discerned in the composition.  The build-up of translucent and opaque paints creates a three-dimensional image that is emblematic of Rouault's oeuvre.  The use of cobalt blue in the background complemented by deep swaths of black ink to delineate the circus performer are signature elements of his painting created during the height of his artistic output.

Fig. 1: The artist in his studio circa 1950.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York