N08788

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Lot 13
  • 13

Alexander Evgenievich Iacovleff

Estimate
300,000 - 500,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Alexander Evgenievich Iacovleff
  • Sidewalk Shop, Capri, 1929
  • bears artist's stamp (lower right); variously labeled for exhibition and sale (on the stretcher)

  • tempera on canvas
  • 38 1/4 by 68 1/4 in., 97 by 173.5 cm

Provenance

Sandra Iacovleff (acquired directly from the artist)
Vose Galleries, Boston
Sale: Skinner, Inc., Boston, April 10, 1992, lot 63
Private Collection, New York
Acquired directly from the above by the present owner

Exhibited

Fitchburg, Fitchburg Art Museum, Alexandre Iacovleff Memorial Exhibition, January-February 1954

Catalogue Note

Sidewalk Shop, Capri is a dazzling representation of Iacovleff's sojourn on the Italian isle in 1929. He set up a studio there and painted a significant number of pictures between sporting breaks in the bay. These images are unique in the artist's oeuvre for their pastel palette and daringly loose brushstroke, perhaps reflecting the leisurely and even playful approach to art that these environs inspired in him. Yet for all its seeming simplicity, Iacovleff's Capri output underscores his brilliant skill as a colorist, as well as his unexpectedly well-grounded understanding of Impressionist technique. He may have traveled the world, ambitiously striving to record the faces and places he saw with restrained clarity, but his time in Capri released in Iacovleff something beautifully free and relaxed. On more than one occasion he acknowledged the effect the place had on him and, according to friend and biographer Martin Birnbaum, the artist's dying wish was that his "ashes be strewn on the emerald waters of his beloved Capri" (Jacovleff and Other Artists, 1946, p. 22).

In 1934 Iacovleff was invited to become head of the painting department at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he became acquainted with the Vose family and elected for them to represent his artwork in the states. This particular painting was left to the artist's surviving sister, Sandra, before making its way to Vose Galleries with the rest of his estate.

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